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Assessing Globalization’s Critics: “Talkers Are No Good Doers?”

In: Challenges to Globalization: Analyzing the Economics

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  • Kimberly Ann. Elliott
  • Debayani Kar
  • J. David Richardson

Abstract

This paper is about the critics of the "doers" of globalization. It describes who they are, where they came from, what they want, how economists, policymakers, and others might understand them better, and where globalization might head from here. Many critics are themselves strongly internationalist and want to see globalization proceed, but under different rules. Some, particularly the protesters in the streets, focus mainly on what is wrong with the world. But some of them put forward broad alternative visions and others offer detailed recommendations for alleviating the problems they see arising from status quo globalization. Most of them have roots in long-standing transnational advocacy efforts to protect human rights and the environment and reduce poverty around the world. What brings them together today is their shared concern that the process by which globalization's rules are being written and implemented is undermining democracy and failing to spread the benefits broadly. This paper sketches the key issues and concerns that motivate the critics in a way that is broadly representative and intelligible to economists. It finds more resonance for the critics' agenda in economics than they commonly recognize. And it attempts to capture the concerns of Southern as well as Northern critics and to analyze the issues that divide as well as bring them together. Finally, it evaluates those issues and alternative proposals on which even globalization enthusiasts and the critics might come together cooperatively.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Robert E. Baldwin & L. Alan Winters, 2004. "Challenges to Globalization: Analyzing the Economics," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bald04-1, October.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 9532.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:9532

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    1. Wood, Adrian, 1995. "North-South Trade, Employment and Inequality: Changing Fortunes in a Skill-Driven World," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, number 9780198290155, October.
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    Cited by:
    1. Stanley Fischer, 2003. "Globalization and Its Challenges," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 1-30, May.
    2. Thierry Verdier, 2005. "Intégration commerciale « socialement responsable » : une approche en termes d'économie politique," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 19(4), pages 55-121.
    3. Emma Aisbett, 2007. "Why are the Critics So Convinced that Globalization is Bad for the Poor?," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization and Poverty, pages 33-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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