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Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths

In: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons

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  • David G. Blanchflower
  • Lisa M. Lynch

Abstract

This paper compares and contrasts the structure of pest school training for young nonuniversity graduates in Britain and the United States. We utilize two unique longitudinal surveys in these countries on young people to examine four issues: the extent of pest school training in Britain and the U.S. and the wage gains associated with it; the link between formal training and further qualifications in Britain and the return to this on wages; differentials in the training experience by gender in the two countries; and the possible implications for skill development in Britain of dismantling significant elements of the traditional apprenticeship system. Our principal findings are that non-college graduates in Britain receive much more post school training than similar youths in the United States. This training is also linked with higher national recognized qualifications. The rates of return to pest school training in both countries is high. especially in the United States. The higher rates of return to training in the U.S. is consistent with underinvestment in training in the U.S.. When the sample is divided by gender, however, women in the U.S. receive more training than their British counterparts and their wages increase by a greater amount. As Britain has replaced the traditional apprenticeship system with a government-led program called Youth Training more women seem to be receiving training after school. However, far fewer young people are obtaining qualifications after their training.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Lisa M. Lynch, 1994. "Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number lync94-1.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 8783.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8783

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    References

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    1. David Blanchflower & A Oswald, 1993. "International Wage Curve," CEP Discussion Papers dp0116, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
      • David G. Blanchflower & Andrew Oswald, 1995. "International Wage Curves," NBER Chapters, in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 145-174 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Blanchflower, D. & Oswald, A. & Garrett, M., 1988. "Insider Power In Wage Determination," Papers 319, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
    3. Greenhalgh, C. & Mavrotas, G., 1991. "Workforce Training in the Thatcher Era - Market Forces and Market Failures," Economics Series Working Papers 99120, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
    5. S.J. Prais & Karin Wagner, 1983. "Some Practical Aspects of Human Capital Investment: Training Standards in Five Occupations in Britain and Germany," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 105(1), pages 46-65, August.
    6. Blanchflower, D. & Oswald, A., 1989. "The Wage Curve," Papers 340, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
    7. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    8. Greenhalgh, Christine & Stewart, Mark, 1982. "The effects and Determinants of Training," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 213, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    9. Greenhalgh, C. & Mavrotas, G., 1991. "Job Training, New Technology and Labour Turnover," Economics Series Working Papers 99121, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    10. Lynch, Lisa M, 1991. "The Role of Off-the-Job vs. On-the-Job Training for the Mobility of Women Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 151-56, May.
    11. Blanchflower, D., 1989. "Fear, Unemployment And Pay Flexibility," Papers 344, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
    12. Lynch, Lisa M., 1985. "State dependency in youth unemployment : A lost generation?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 71-84, April.
    13. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
    14. Micklewright, John, 1989. "Choice at Sixteen," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(221), pages 25-39, February.
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