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Does Social Security Induce Withdrawal of the Old from the Labor Force and Create Jobs for the Young? The Case of Japan

In: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment

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  • Takashi Oshio
  • Satoshi Shimizutani
  • Akiko Sato Oishi

Abstract

This paper examines whether social security programs induce a withdrawal of the elderly from the labor force and create jobs for the young in Japan. The key messages are summarized as follows. First, our historical overview suggests that young unemployment issues have not motivated social security reforms and that changes in provisions are not endogenous. Second, employment of the young tends to be positively, not negatively, associated with the LFP of the old. Third, an increase in the inducement to retire significantly discourages the old from staying in the labor force, but does not create jobs for the young.

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Bibliographic Info

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This chapter was published in:

  • Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2010. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub08-1, May.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 8257.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8257

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    References

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    1. Satoshi Shimizutani & Izumi Yokoyama, 2006. "Has Japan's Long-term employment Practice Survived? New Evidence Emerging Since the 1990s," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d06-182, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
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    Cited by:
    1. Satoshi Shimizutani & Mayu Fujii & Takashi Oshio, 2014. "Option Value of Work, Health Status, and Retirement Decisions in Japan: Evidence from the Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement (JSTAR)," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: Disability Insurance Programs and Retirement National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi & FUJII Mayu & OSHIO Takashi, 2012. "Option Value of Work, Health Status, and Retirement Decisions: New evidence from the Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement (JSTAR)," Discussion papers 12050, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi & OSHIO Takashi, 2013. "Revisiting the Labor Supply Effect of Social Security Earnings Test: New evidence from its elimination and reinstatement in Japan," Discussion papers 13016, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi & OSHIO Takashi, 2012. "Public Pension Benefits Claiming Behavior: New evidence from the Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement," Discussion papers 12068, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Okumura, Tsunao & Usui, Emiko, 2012. "The Effect of Pension Reform on Pension-Benefit Expectations and Savings Decisions in Japan," CIS Discussion paper series 559, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Shimizutani, Satoshi, 2011. "A new anatomy of the retirement process in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 141-152.
    7. ICHIMURA Hidehiko & SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi, 2011. "Retirement Process in Japan: New evidence from Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement (JSTAR)," Discussion papers 11080, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    8. Takashi Oshio & Satoshi Shimizutani, 2011. "Disability Pension Program and Labor Force Participation in Japan: A Historical Perspective," NBER Working Papers 17052, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Shimizutani, Satoshi & Oshio, Takashi, 2009. "New Evidence on Initial Transition from Career Job to Retirement in Japan," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 430, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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