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Stochastic Problems in the Simulation of Labor Supply

In: Behavioral Simulation Methods in Tax Policy Analysis

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  • Jerry A. Hausman

Abstract

Modern work in labor supply attempts to account for nonlinear budget sets created by government tax and transfer programs. Progressive taxation leads to nonlinear convex budget sets while the earned income credit, social security contributions, AFDC, and the proposed NIT plans all lead to nonlinear, nonconvex budget sets. Where nonlinear budget sets occur, the expected value of the random variable, labor supply, can no longer be calculated by simply 'plugging in' the estimated coefficients. Properties of the stochastic terms which arise from the residual or from a stochastic preference structure need to be accounted for. This paper considers both analytical approaches and Monte Carlo approaches to the problem. We attempt to find accurate and low cost computational techniques which would permit extensive use of simulation methodology. Large samples are typically included in such simulations which makes computational techniques an important consideration. But these large samples may also lead to simplifications in computational techniques because of the averaging process used in calculation of simulation results. This paper investigates the tradeoffs available between computational accuracy and cost in simulation exercises over large samples.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Martin Feldstein, 1983. "Behavioral Simulation Methods in Tax Policy Analysis," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number feld83-2, July.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 7705.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:7705

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    1. Diamond, P. A. & McFadden, D. L., 1974. "Some uses of the expenditure function in public finance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 3-21, February.
    2. Hausman, Jerry A., 1979. "The econometrics of labor supply on convex budget sets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 171-174.
    3. Atkinson, A. B. & Stiglitz, J. E., 1976. "The design of tax structure: Direct versus indirect taxation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1-2), pages 55-75.
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    Cited by:
    1. Peter C. Reiss & Matthew W. White, 2006. "Evaluating Welfare with Nonlinear Prices," NBER Working Papers 12370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Grodner, Andrew & Kniesner, Thomas J. & Bishop, John A., 2011. "Social Interactions in the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 5934, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Soest, A.H.O. van & Kooreman, P. & Kapteyn, A.J., 1990. "Coherency and regularity of demand systems with equality and inequality constraints," Discussion Paper 1990-1, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    4. Bianchi, Marco & Gudmundsson, Björn R & Zoega, Gylfi, 2000. "Iceland's Natural Experiment in Supply-Side Economics," CEPR Discussion Papers 2367, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Fullerton, Don & Gan, Li, 2004. "A simulation-based welfare loss calculation for labor taxes with piecewise-linear budgets," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(11), pages 2339-2359, September.
    6. Seko, Miki, 2002. "Nonlinear budget constraints and estimation: effects of subsidized home loans on floor space decisions in Japan," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 280-299, September.
    7. Sielaff, Christian, 2011. "Steuerkomplexität und Arbeitsangebot: Eine experimentelle Analyse," Discussion Papers 2011/13, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

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