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Social Security and Retirement in Belgium

In: Social Security and Retirement around the World

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  • Pierre Pestieau
  • Jean-Philippe Stijns

Abstract

Belgium like many other industrialized countries is facing serious problems in financing its social security. Whereas the effects of aging are still to come, Belgium currently experiences one of the lowest attachments to the labor force of older persons. This paper presents the key features of the Belgian social security system and focuses on labor force participation and benefit receipt. Most of the attention is given to the interaction between retirement behavior and the various social security schemes. By measuring the implicit tax/subsidy rate on work after 55 through these schemes, we can so explain the actual pattern of early and normal retirement of Belgian older workers.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement around the World," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub99-1.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 7248.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:7248

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Peter Diamond, 2004. "Social Security," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 1-24, March.
    2. Pepermans, G, 1992. "Retirement Decisions in a Discrete Choice Model and Implications for the Government Budget: The Case of Belgium," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 229-43, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Kevin Milligan & Tammy Schirle, 2008. "Improving the Labour Market Incentives of Canada's Public Pensions," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 34(3), pages 281-304, September.
    2. Mathieu Lefebvre & Kristian Orsini, 2012. "A structural model for early exit of older men in Belgium," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 379-398, August.
    3. Desmet, Raphael & Jousten, Alain & Perelman, Sergio, 2005. "The Benefits of Separating Early Retirees from the Unemployed: Simulation Results for Belgian Wage Earners," CEPR Discussion Papers 5077, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martín, 2003. "Social security, retirement, and the single-mindedness of the electorate," Economics Working Papers 686, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    5. Axel Borsch-Supan, 1998. "Incentive Effects of Social Security on Labor Force Participation: Evidence in Germany and Across Europe," NBER Working Papers 6780, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gungor Karakaya, 2009. "Early cessation of activity in the labour market: impact of supply and demand factors," DULBEA Working Papers 09-04.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    7. Miles, David K, 2000. "Funded and Unfunded Pensions: Risk, Return and Welfare," CEPR Discussion Papers 2369, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Borsch-Supan, Axel, 2000. "Incentive effects of social security on labor force participation: evidence in Germany and across Europe," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1-2), pages 25-49, October.
    9. Pierre Pestieau & Mathieu Lefèbvre & Alain Jousten & Sergio Perelman, 2008. "The Effects of Early Retirementon Youth Unemployment," IMF Working Papers 08/30, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Casey B Mulligan, 1999. "Gerontocracy, Retirement, and Social Security," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 154, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    11. Casey B. Mulligan, 2000. "Induced Retirement, Social Security, and the Pyramid Mirage," NBER Working Papers 7679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Gilles Le Garrec, 2001. "Systèmes de retraite par répartition, mode de calcul des droits à pension et croissance," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 67(4), pages 357-380.
    13. Luís Eduardo Afonso & Adriana Schor, 2001. "oferta de Trabalho dos Indivíduos com Idade Superior a 50 Anos: Algumas Características da Década de 90," Anais do XXIX Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 29th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 092, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].

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