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Micro-Modeling of Retirement Decisions in Germany

In: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation

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Author Info

  • Axel Börsch-Supan
  • Reinhold Schnabel
  • Simone Kohnz
  • Giovanni Mastrobuoni

Abstract

Early retirement in Germany is very costly and amplifies the burden which the German public pension system has to carry due to population aging. This paper shows that the German pension system provides strong incentives to retire early. The paper provides relatively robust econometric evidence for the strength of incentive effects on old age labor supply, using several specifications of incentive variables. The econometric estimates are used to simulate the individual responses to policy changes. The adjustment factors for early retirement introduced by the 1992 pension reform are estimated to increase the retirement age of men by about 1.5 years. This increase is almost the same as the effect from a shift in the “normal retirement” age from 65 to 67. Introducing (almost) fair adjustments (6% per year of delay) would increase the retirement age by about 2 years and 2 months. The effects are about half the size for women.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2004. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub04-1, May.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 10703.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:10703

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Borsch-Supan, A., 1995. "Regional Development, Capital Flows and Trade Policies in an Aging Europe," Papers 11, American Institute for Contemporary German Studies-.
    2. James H. Stock & David A. Wise, 1990. "The Pension Inducement to Retire: An Option Value Analysis," NBER Chapters, in: Issues in the Economics of Aging, pages 205-230 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. John P. Rust, 1990. "Behavior of Male Workers at the End of the Life Cycle: An Empirical Analysis of States and Controls," NBER Chapters, in: Issues in the Economics of Aging, pages 317-382 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. John Rust & Christopher Phelan, 1997. "How Social Security and Medicare Affect Retirement Behavior in a World of Incomplete Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(4), pages 781-832, July.
    5. Sikandar Siddiqui, 1997. "The pension incentive to retire: Empirical evidence for West Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 463-486.
    6. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. repec:crr:crrwps:2003-04 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Glenn T. Sueyoshi, 1989. "Social Security and the Determinants of Full and Partial Retirement: A Competing Risks Analysis," NBER Working Papers 3113, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Riphahn, Regina T. & Schmidt, Peter, 1995. "Determinanten des Rentenzugangs: Lockt der Ruhestand oder drängt der Arbeitsmarkt?," ZEW Discussion Papers 95-10, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    10. Costas Meghir & Whitehouse, E, 1995. "Labour market transitions and retirement of men in the UK," IFS Working Papers W95/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    11. Borsch-Supan, Axel & Schnabel, Reinhold, 1998. "Social Security and Declining Labor-Force Participation in Germany," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 173-78, May.
    12. Borsch-Supan, Axel, 2000. "A Model under Siege: A Case Study of the German Retirement Insurance System," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(461), pages F24-45, February.
    13. Axel Boersch-Supan, 1999. "Incentive Effects of Social Security Under an Uncertain Disability Option," NBER Working Papers 7339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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