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The Supplemental Security Income Program

In: Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States

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  • Mary Daly
  • Richard V. Burkhauser

Abstract

In general, our examination suggests that in the absence of a universal guaranteed income program for all Americans, the operational flexibility of the categorical eligibility criteria for SSI has made the program sensitive to both downturns in the business cycle and to increases in the pool of vulnerable people. Moreover, when the dividing lines separating the working-age adult and child populations eligible for SSI from those eligible for other income-based benefits are imprecise, as with disability, policy changes in other welfare programs likely will affect SSI caseloads.

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Bibliographic Info

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This chapter was published in:

  • Robert A. Moffitt, 2003. "Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number moff03-1, July.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 10255.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:10255

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    Cited by:
    1. Hungerman, Daniel M., 2009. "Crowd-out and diversity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(5-6), pages 729-740, June.
    2. Mark G. Duggan & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2007. "The impact of child SSI enrollment on household outcomes," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 861-886.
    3. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly, 2002. "Policy Watch: U.S. Disability Policy in a Changing Environment," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 213-224, Winter.
    4. Ivan Vidangos, 2009. "Household welfare, precautionary saving, and social insurance under multiple sources of risk," Finance and Economics Discussion Series, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) 2009-14, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly & Philip R. de Jong, 2008. "Curing the Dutch Disease: Lessons for United States Disability Policy," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp188, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    6. Carneiro, Pedro & Ginja, Rita, 2012. "Long Term Impacts of Compensatory Preschool on Health and Behavior: Evidence from Head Start," Working Paper Series, Uppsala University, Department of Economics 2012:5, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. Richard Burkhauser & Jeff Larrimore, 2008. "Trends in the Relative Household Income of Working-Age Men with Work Limitations: Correcting the Record Using Internal Current Population Survey Data," Working Papers, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau 08-05, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    8. John Bound & Richard Burkhauser & Austin Nichols, 2001. "Tracking the Household Income of SSDI and SSI Applicants," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp009, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    9. Mark Duggan & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2005. "The Impact of Child SSI Enrollment on Household Outcomes: Evidence from the Survey of Income and Program Participation," NBER Working Papers 11568, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Henrik Jacobsen Kleven & Wojciech Kopczuk, 2008. "Transfer Program Complexity and the Take Up of Social Benefits," NBER Working Papers 14301, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Daniel M. Hungerman, 2007. "Diversity and Crowd-out: A Theory of Cold-Glow Giving," NBER Working Papers 13348, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly & Jeff Larrimore & Joyce Kwok, 2008. "The Transformation in Who is Expected to Work in the United States and How it Changed the Lives of Single Mothers and People with Disabilities," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp187, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.

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