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Rural Poverty and Income Dynamics in Southeast Asia

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  • Estudillo, Jonna P.
  • Otsuka, Keijiro

Abstract

Many rural households in Asia have been able to move out of poverty in the presence of increasing scarcity of farmland, initially by increasing rice income through the adoption of modern rice technology and gradually diversifying their income sources away from farm to nonfarm activities. Increased participation in nonfarm employment has been more pronounced among the more educated children, whose education is facilitated by an increase in farm income brought about by the spread of modern rice technology. An important lesson for poverty reduction is to increase agricultural productivity through the development and adoption of modern technology, which subsequently stimulates the development of the nonfarm sector, thereby providing employment opportunities for the rural labor force. This chapter explores the key processes of long-term poverty reduction in Southeast Asia using the Philippines and Thailand as case studies.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Robert Evenson & Prabhu Pingali (ed.), 2010. "Handbook of Agricultural Economics," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 4, number 1, 00.
    This item is provided by Elsevier in its series Handbook of Agricultural Economics with number 6-67.

    Handle: RePEc:eee:hagchp:6-67

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookseriesdescription.cws_home/BS_HE/description

    Related research

    Keywords: Green Revolution; poverty; nonfarm employment; child schooling;

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    Cited by:
    1. Kym Anderson & John Cockburn & Will Martin, 2009. "Would Freeing Up World Trade Reduce Poverty and Inequality? The Vexed Role of Agricultural Distortions," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2009-05, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    2. Yukichi Mano & Takashi Yamano & Aya Suzuki & Tomoya Matsumoto, 2011. "Local and Personal Networks in Employment and the Development of Labor Markets:Evidence from the Cut Flower Industry in Ethiopia," GRIPS Discussion Papers 10-29, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    3. Dethier, Jean-Jacques & Effenberger, Alexandra, 2011. "Agriculture and development : a brief review of the literature," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5553, The World Bank.
    4. CĂ©line Guimas, 2012. "Effect of organic contract farming on labor demand. A study case in the Western Uganda," Post-Print dumas-00802135, HAL.

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