Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to follow this author

Michael Bernard Coelli

Contents:

This is information that was supplied by Michael Coelli in registering through RePEc. If you are Michael Bernard Coelli , you may change this information at the RePEc Author Service. Or if you are not registered and would like to be listed as well, register at the RePEc Author Service. When you register or update your RePEc registration, you may identify the papers and articles you have authored.

Personal Details

First Name: Michael
Middle Name: Bernard
Last Name: Coelli
Suffix:

RePEc Short-ID: pco256

Email:
Homepage: http://www.economics.unimelb.edu.au/staffprofile/mcoelli.htm
Postal Address: Department of Economics The University of Melbourne Level 4, FBE Building 111 Barry Street Parkville, VIC, 3010 Australia
Phone:

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Faculty of Business and Economics
University of Melbourne
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Homepage: http://www.economics.unimelb.edu.au/
Email:
Phone: + 61 3 9344 5289
Fax: + 61 3 9344 6899
Postal: University of Melbourne VIC 3010
Handle: RePEc:edi:demelau (more details at EDIRC)

Works

as in new window

Working papers

  1. Wang-Sheng Lee & Michael B. Coelli, 2010. "The Labour Market Effects of Vocational Education and Training in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne wp2010n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Michael B. Coelli, 2010. "The Forgotten Second Quartile: Parental Income and Youth Post-secondary Education Enrolment in Australia," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series, The University of Melbourne 1107, The University of Melbourne.
  3. Michael B Coelli, 2009. "Parental Job Loss, Income Shocks and the Education Enrolment of Youth," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series, The University of Melbourne 1060, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Michael Coelli & Roger Wilkins, 2008. "Credential Changes and Education Earnings Premia in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne wp2008n11, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  5. Michael B. Coelli & David A. Green & William P. Warburton, 2004. "Breaking the cycle? The effect of education on welfare receipt among children of welfare recipients," IFS Working Papers, Institute for Fiscal Studies W04/14, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  6. Michael Coelli & Jerome Fahrer & Holly Lindsay, 1994. "Wage Dispersion and Labour Market Institutions: A Cross Country Study," RBA Research Discussion Papers, Reserve Bank of Australia rdp9404, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  7. Michael Coelli & Jerome Fahrer, 1992. "Indicators of Inflationary Pressure," RBA Research Discussion Papers, Reserve Bank of Australia rdp9207, Reserve Bank of Australia.

Articles

  1. Coelli, Michael & Green, David A., 2012. "Leadership effects: school principals and student outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 92-109.
  2. Coelli, Michael B., 2011. "Parental job loss and the education enrollment of youth," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 25-35, January.
  3. Wang‐Sheng Lee & Michael B. Coelli, 2010. "The Labour Market Effects of Vocational Education and Training in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(4), pages 389-408, December.
  4. Michael B. Coelli, 2009. "Tuition fees and equality of university enrolment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(3), pages 1072-1099, August.
  5. Michael Coelli & Roger Wilkins, 2009. "Credential Changes and Education Earnings Premia in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(270), pages 239-259, 09.
  6. Michael Coelli & Roger Wilkins, 2008. "Are Skills Shortages a Constraint on Increasing Employment in Australia?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(3), pages 310-322, 09.
  7. Coelli, Michael B. & Green, David A. & Warburton, William P., 2007. "Breaking the cycle? The effect of education on welfare receipt among children of welfare recipients," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 91(7-8), pages 1369-1398, August.

NEP Fields

5 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (4) 2008-08-31 2008-11-25 2010-01-10 2010-04-17. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2010-01-10 2010-04-17. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (5) 2005-03-13 2008-08-31 2008-11-25 2010-01-10 2010-04-17. Author is listed
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2005-03-13

Statistics

Most cited item

Most downloaded item (past 12 months)

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Michael Coelli should log into the RePEc Author Service

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.