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Manisha Shah

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Personal Details

First Name: Manisha
Middle Name:
Last Name: Shah
Suffix:

RePEc Short-ID: psh195

Email:
Homepage: http://publicaffairs.ucla.edu/manisha-shah
Postal Address: UCLA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC POLICY LUSKIN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS 3250 PUBLIC AFFAIRS BUILDING LOS ANGELES, CA 90095-1656
Phone:

Affiliation

Luskin School of Public Affairs
University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA)
Location: Los Angeles, California (United States)
Homepage: http://luskin.ucla.edu/
Email:
Phone: (310) 206-7568
Fax:
Postal: 3250 Public Policy Building, Box 951656, Los Angeles, California 90095-1656
Handle: RePEc:edi:spuclus (more details at EDIRC)

Works

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Working papers

  1. Manisha Shah & Bryce Millett Steinberg, 2013. "Drought of Opportunities: Contemporaneous and Long Term Impacts of Rainfall Shocks on Human Capital," NBER Working Papers 19140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Cameron, Lisa & Shah, Manisha & Olivia, Susan, 2013. "Impact evaluation of a large-scale rural sanitation project in Indonesia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6360, The World Bank.
  3. Cameron, Lisa A. & Shah, Manisha, 2012. "Risk-Taking Behavior in the Wake of Natural Disasters," IZA Discussion Papers 6756, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Cameron, Lisa A. & Shah, Manisha, 2012. "Can Mistargeting Destroy Social Capital and Stimulate Crime? Evidence from a Cash Transfer Program in Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 6736, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Arunachalam, Raj & Shah, Manisha, 2010. "The Prostitute's Allure: Examining Returns to Beauty, Productivity and Discrimination," IZA Discussion Papers 5064, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Frijters, Paul & Johnston, David W. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2010. "Intra-household Resource Allocation: Do Parents Reduce or Reinforce Child Cognitive Ability Gaps?," IZA Discussion Papers 5153, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Johnston, David W. & Nicholls, Michael E. R. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2010. "Handedness, Health and Cognitive Development: Evidence from Children in the NLSY," IZA Discussion Papers 4774, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Trevon Logan & Manisha Shah, 2009. "Face Value: Information and Signaling in an Illegal Market," NBER Working Papers 14841, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Frijters, Paul & Johnston, David W. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2008. "Early Child Development and Maternal Labor Force Participation: Using Handedness as an Instrument," IZA Discussion Papers 3537, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Johnston, David W. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2007. "Handedness, Time Use and Early Childhood Development," IZA Discussion Papers 2752, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Articles

  1. Lisa Cameron & Manisha Shah, 2014. "Can Mistargeting Destroy Social Capital and Stimulate Crime? Evidence from a Cash Transfer Program in Indonesia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(2), pages 381 - 415.
  2. Manisha Shah, 2013. "Do Sex Workers Respond to Disease? Evidence from the Male Market for Sex," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 445-50, May.
  3. Paul Frijters & David Johnston & Manisha Shah & Michael Shields, 2013. "Intrahousehold Resource Allocation: Do Parents Reduce or Reinforce Child Ability Gaps?," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2187-2208, December.
  4. David W. Johnston & Michael E. R. Nicholls & Manisha Shah & Michael A. Shields, 2013. "Handedness, health and cognitive development: evidence from children in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 176(4), pages 841-860, October.
  5. Trevon D. Logan & Manisha Shah, 2013. "Face Value: Information and Signaling in an Illegal Market," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 529-564, January.
  6. Raj Arunachalam & Manisha Shah, 2013. "Compensated for Life: Sex Work and Disease Risk," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(2), pages 345-369.
  7. Arunachalam Raj & Shah Manisha, 2012. "The Prostitute's Allure: The Return to Beauty in Commercial Sex Work," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-27, December.
  8. Paul J. Gertler & Manisha Shah, 2011. "Sex Work and Infection: What’s Law Enforcement Got to Do with It?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(4), pages 811 - 840.
  9. Paul Frijters & David W. Johnston & Manisha Shah & Michael A. Shields, 2009. "To Work or Not to Work? Child Development and Maternal Labor Supply," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(3), pages 97-110, July.
  10. David Johnston & Michael Nicholls & Manisha Shah & Michael Shields, 2009. "Nature’s experiment? Handedness and early childhood development," Demography, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 281-301, May.
  11. Manisha Shah, 2008. "Making Sex Work: A Failed Experiment with Legalized Prostitution," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 216-218.
  12. Raj Arunachalam & Manisha Shah, 2008. "Prostitutes and Brides?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 516-22, May.
  13. Paul Gertler & Manisha Shah & Stefano M. Bertozzi, 2005. "Risky Business: The Market for Unprotected Commercial Sex," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(3), pages 518-550, June.

NEP Fields

11 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (2) 2010-03-06 2010-09-11
  2. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2009-04-13
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2012-07-29 2013-03-09
  4. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2007-05-12 2010-09-11
  5. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (2) 2012-09-30 2013-10-25
  6. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2010-03-06
  7. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2010-03-06 2013-03-09
  8. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2013-06-24
  9. NEP-ICT: Information & Communication Technologies (1) 2009-04-13
  10. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2008-07-14 2009-04-13 2010-07-31 2010-09-11. Author is listed
  11. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (2) 2010-03-06 2010-09-11
  12. NEP-PPM: Project, Program & Portfolio Management (1) 2013-03-09
  13. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (4) 2012-07-29 2012-09-30 2013-03-09 2013-10-25. Author is listed
  14. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2012-07-29
  15. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2012-09-30

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