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Stacey Hsiangju Chen

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This is information that was supplied by Stacey Chen in registering through RePEc. If you are Stacey Hsiangju Chen , you may change this information at the RePEc Author Service. Or if you are not registered and would like to be listed as well, register at the RePEc Author Service. When you register or update your RePEc registration, you may identify the papers and articles you have authored.

Personal Details

First Name: Stacey
Middle Name: Hsiangju
Last Name: Chen
Suffix:

RePEc Short-ID: pch141

Email:
Homepage: http://www.nber.org/~chens/
Postal Address:
Phone:

Affiliation

(99%) Institute of Economics
Academia Sinica
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
Homepage: http://www.sinica.edu.tw/econ/
Email:
Phone: 886-2-27822791
Fax: 886-2-27853946
Postal:
Handle: RePEc:edi:sinictw (more details at EDIRC)
(1%) Institute of Fiscal Studies
Homepage: http://www.ifs.org.uk/
Location: London UK

Works

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Working papers

  1. Stacey H. Chen & Yen-Chien Chen & Jin-Tan Liu, 2014. "The Impact of Family Composition on Educational Achievement," NBER Working Papers 20443, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Stacey H. Chen & Shakeeb Khan, 2012. "Semi-parametric Estimation of Program Impacts on Dispersion of Potential Wages," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 12-A013, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
  3. Joshua D. Angrist & Stacey H. Chen & Brigham R. Frandsen, 2009. "Did Vietnam Veterans Get Sicker in the 1990s? The Complicated Effects of Military Service on Self-Reported Health," NBER Working Papers 14781, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Stacey H. Chen & Yen-Chien Chen & Jin-Tan Liu, 2009. "The Impact of Sibling Sex Composition on Women's Educational Achievements: A Unique Natural Experiment by Twins Gender Shocks," Royal Holloway, University of London: Discussion Papers in Economics 09/08, Department of Economics, Royal Holloway University of London.
  5. Yen-Chien Chen & Stacey H. Chen & Jin-Tan Liu, 2009. "Separate Effects of Sibling Gender and Family Size on Educational Achievements - Methods and First Evidence from Population Birth Registry," Royal Holloway, University of London: Discussion Papers in Economics 09/03, Department of Economics, Royal Holloway University of London.
  6. Angrist, Joshua & Chen, Stacey, 2008. "Long-Term Economic Consequences of Vietnam-Era Conscription: Schooling, Experience and Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 3628, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Joshua D. Angrist & Stacey H. Chen, 2007. "Long-term consequences of vietnam-era conscription: schooling, experience, and earnings," NBER Working Papers 13411, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Joshua Angrist & Stacey Chen, 2007. "Long-Term Effects of Vietnam-Era Conscription: Schooling, Experience and Earnings," Working Papers 07-23, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  9. Stacey H. Chen, 2003. "Estimating the Variance of Wages in the Presence of Selection and Unobservable Heterogeneity," Discussion Papers 03-01, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
  10. Stacey H. Chen & Shakeeb Khan, 2003. "Nonparametric Estimation of Average Volatility Differentials in Selection Models with an Application to Returns to Schooling," Discussion Papers 03-02, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
  11. Stacey H. Chen, 2003. "Risk Aversion and College Attendance," Discussion Papers 03-03, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
  12. Stacey H. Chen, 2002. "Is Investing College Education Risky?," Labor and Demography 0202001, EconWPA.
  13. Stacey Chen, 2001. "Is Investing in College Education Risky?," Discussion Papers 01-09, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Joshua D. Angrist & Stacey H. Chen & Jae Song, 2011. "Long-Term Consequences of Vietnam-Era Conscription: New Estimates Using Social Security Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 334-38, May.
  2. Stacey H. Chen & Yen-Chien Chen & Jin-Tan Liu, 2009. "The Impact of Unexpected Maternal Death on Education: First Evidence from Three National Administrative Data Links," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 149-53, May.
  3. Stacey H. Chen, 2008. "Estimating the Variance of Wages in the Presence of Selection and Unobserved Heterogeneity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 275-289, May.
  4. Stacey H. CHEN, 2008. "Estimating Effective Subsidy Rates of Student Aid Programs," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 91-92, pages 409-425.

NEP Fields

9 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2003-07-16
  2. NEP-EDU: Education (3) 2008-08-14 2009-03-28 2009-04-25. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2009-03-14 2009-09-05 2011-06-11. Author is listed
  4. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2007-09-24
  5. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2009-09-05
  6. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (7) 2003-07-13 2007-09-24 2008-08-14 2009-03-28 2009-04-25 2011-06-11 2012-12-22. Author is listed
  7. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2009-03-28

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