Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book or follow this series

Good Practices in Health Financing : Lessons from Reforms in Low and Middle-Income Countries

Contents:

Author Info

  • Pablo Gottret
  • George J. Schieber
  • Hugh R. Waters
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This volume focuses on nine countries that have completed, or are well along in the process of carrying out, major health financing reforms. These countries have significantly expanded their people's health care coverage or maintained such coverage after prolonged political or economic shocks. In doing so, this report seeks to expand the evidence base on good performance in health financing reforms in low- and middle-income countries. The countries chosen for the study were Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Estonia, the Kyrgyz Republic, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia, and Vietnam. With health at the center of global development policy on humanitarian as well as economic and health security grounds, the international community and developing countries are closely focused on scaling up health systems to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), improving financial protection, and ensuring long-term financing to sustain these gains. With the scaling up of aid, both donors and countries have come to realize that money alone cannot buy health gains or prevent impoverishment due to catastrophic medical bills. This realization has sent policy makers looking for reliable evidence about what works and what does not, but they have found little to guide their search.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/6442/446440PUB0Heal101OFFICIAL0USE0ONLY1.pdf?sequence=1
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    as in new window
    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 6442 and published in 2008.

    ISBN: 978-0-8213-7511-2
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6442

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Email:
    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Law and Development - Health Law Health Economics and Finance Health; Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Health Monitoring and Evaluation Health Systems Development and Reform Health; Nutrition and Population;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Fwu-Ranq Chang & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2003. "Economics of self-medication: theory and evidence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(9), pages 721-739.
    2. van de Walle, Dominique & Gunewardena, Dileni, 2001. "Sources of ethnic inequality in Viet Nam," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 177-207, June.
    3. van de Walle, Dominique, 2003. "Testing Vietnam's public safety net," Social Protection Discussion Papers 27874, The World Bank.
    4. Ardeshir Sepehri & Sisira Sarma & Wayne Simpson, 2006. "Does non-profit health insurance reduce financial burden? Evidence from the Vietnam living standards survey panel," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(6), pages 603-616.
    5. Matthew Jowett & Anil Deolalikar & Peter Martinsson, 2004. "Health insurance and treatment seeking behaviour: evidence from a low-income country," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(9), pages 845-857.
    6. Wagstaff, Adam, 2005. "The economic consequences of health shocks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3644, The World Bank.
    7. World Bank, 2006. "World Development Indicators 2006," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 8151, October.
    8. Wagstaff, Adam & Pradhan, Menno, 2005. "Health insurance impacts on health and nonmedical consumption in a developing country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3563, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Mohammad Abu-Zaineh & Habiba Romdhane & Bruno Ventelou & Jean-Paul Moatti & Arfa Chokri, 2013. "Appraising financial protection in health: the case of Tunisia," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 73-93, March.
    2. Dominic Haazen, 2012. "Making Health Financing Work for Poor People in Tanzania," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2240, October.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6442. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.