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Organization and Performance of Cotton Sectors in Africa : Learning from Reform Experience

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Author Info

  • David Tschirley
  • Colin Poulton
  • Patrick Labaste

Abstract

Cotton is a major source of foreign exchange earnings in more than 15 countries across all regions of Sub-Saharan African (SSA) and a crucial source of cash income for millions of rural people in these countries. The crop is, therefore, critical in the fight against rural poverty. The World Bank and other development institutions have been and are currently assisting many cotton exporting countries of SSA to improve their cotton sector performance through projects supporting investment as well as through policy and institutional reform. Many SSA countries have been implementing or are considering implementing reforms of their cotton industries. The ultimate objective of the reform programs is to strengthen the competitiveness of cotton production, processing, and exports in an increasingly demanding world market and to ensure long-term, sustainable, and equitable growth for these major sectors of many African economies. The reform programs generally entail redefining the role of the state; facilitating greater involvement of the private sector and farmer organizations; ensuring greater competition in input and output markets; improving productivity through research and development, extension, and technology dissemination; and seeking value addition through market development and processing of cotton lint and by-products. A number of SSA cotton sectors, especially in West and Central Africa (WCA), are currently facing serious short-term financial difficulties. It is important to clarify that the purpose of this report is not to provide quick solutions to these short-run problems. Rather, it is to step back, build up a reliable broad assessment of cotton sector performance from detailed empirical information, and thereby provide guidance for the design of strategies that will address the long-term challenges of cotton production and marketing in Africa. Finally, to ensure that a broad perspective was brought to bear, the study was entrusted to a team which includes independent researchers and experts in the field of cotton.

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File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/2604/477210PUB0AFR0101OFFICIAL0USE0ONLY1.pdf?sequence=1
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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 2604 and published in 2009.

ISBN: 978-0-8213-7770-3
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:2604

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Keywords: Agriculture - Crops & Crop Management Systems Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Economic Theory & Research Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Markets and Market Access Private Sector Development - Emerging Markets;

References

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  1. Sarris, Alexander H., 2000. "Has world cereal market instability increased?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 337-350, June.
  2. Vald S, Alberto & Foster, William, 2003. "Special safeguards for developing country agriculture: a proposal for WTO negotiations," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(01), pages 5-31, March.
  3. Tschirley, David L. & Poulton, Colin & Boughton, Duncan, 2006. "The Many Paths of Cotton Sector Reform in Eastern and Southern Africa: Lessons From a Decade of Experience," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54477, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. Tschirley, David L. & Kabwe, Stephen, 2007. "Urgent Need for Effective Public-Private Coordination in Zambia’s Cotton Sector. Deliberations on the Cotton Act," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54627, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  5. Radetzki, Marian, 1985. "Effects of a dollar appreciation on dollar prices in international commodity markets," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 158-159, September.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Delpeuch, Claire & Leblois, Antoine, 2011. "The elusive quest for supply response to cash-crop market reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa : the case of cotton," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5861, The World Bank.
  2. Delpeuch, Claire & Vandeplas, Anneleen & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2010. "Revisiting the “cotton problem”: A comparative analysis of cotton reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa," 84th Annual Conference, March 29-31, 2010, Edinburgh, Scotland 91806, Agricultural Economics Society.
  3. Balineau, Gaëlle, 2013. "Disentangling the Effects of Fair Trade on the Quality of Malian Cotton," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 241-255.
  4. Baffes, John, 2011. "Cotton subsidies, the WTO, and the'cotton problem'," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5663, The World Bank.
  5. Delpeuch, Claire, 2011. "African cotton markets at crossroads : will the price spike turn into a new kick-start ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5847, The World Bank.
  6. Baquedano, Felix G. & Sanders, John H., 2008. "Increasing Cotton Farmers Incomes in Mali West Africa: Eliminate Subsidies in Developed Countries or Productivity Increase in Mali?," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6426, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  7. M. Ataman Aksoy, 2012. "African Agricultural Reforms : The Role of Consensus and Institutions," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 9307, October.
  8. Kelly, Valerie A. & Murekezi, Abdoul Karim & Me-Nsope, Nathalie Mongue & Perakis, Sonja Melissa & Mather, David, 2013. "Cereal Market Dynamics: The Malian Experience from the 1990s to Present," Food Security International Development Working Papers 146935, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  9. Baffes, John, 2010. "Markets for cotton by-products : global trends and implications for African cotton producers," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5355, The World Bank.
  10. Independent Evaluation Group, 2011. "Growth and Productivity in Agriculture and Agribusiness : Evaluative Lessons from World Bank Group Experience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2279, October.
  11. Tschirley, David L. & Kabwe, Stephen, 2010. "A Case Study of Regulation in Zambia’s Cotton Sector," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 62145, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  12. Tschirley, David L. & Kabwe, Stephen, 2007. "Cotton in Zambia: 2007 Assessment of its Organization, Performance, Current Policy Initiatives, and Challenges for the Future," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54485, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  13. Pitoro, Raul & Walker, Thomas S. & Tschirley, David L. & Swinton, Scott M. & Boughton, Duncan & de Marrule, Higino Francisco, 2009. "Can Bt Technology Reduce Poverty Among African Cotton Growers? An Ex Ante Analysis of the Private and Social Profitability of Bt Cotton Seed in Mozambique," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51633, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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