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Economic Implications of an Ageing Australia

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  • Productivity Commission
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    Abstract

    The commissioned study research report into the ‘Economic Implications of an Ageing Australia’ was released April 2005. The Commission found that one quarter of Australians will be aged 65 years or more by 2044-45, roughly double the present proportion. This gives rise to significant policy challenges. The Commission maintains that policy responses would have to be broad and at all levels of government. Policy measures will be needed to reduce the fiscal pressure from ageing and/or to finance the fiscal gap. Reforms would be needed in key human service areas, such as health and aged care, where the pressures of an ageing population will impact most. The resulting fall in labour force participation would also need to be addressed. The Commission shows that raising labour force participation and productivity can partly offset the impacts of an ageing population. These would enhance income growth, helping to sustain economic growth and living standards, and increase the capacity to ‘pay’ for the costs of ageing, as well as through taxation.

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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/69401/ageing.pdf
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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/projects/study/ageing/docs/finalreport
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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Productivity Commission, Government of Australia in its series Research Reports with number 16 and published in 2005.

    ISBN: 1 74037 173 9
    Handle: RePEc:ris:prodcs:16

    Note: 470 pages
    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Level 28, 35 Collins St, Melbourne Victoria 3000
    Phone: 61 3 9653 2100
    Fax: 61 3 9653 2199
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    Web page: http://www.pc.gov.au/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: ageing; health; aged care; labour force; labour supply; economic growth; policy measures; productivity; demographic trends;

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    Cited by:
    1. Prosser, Brenton & Clark, Shannon & Davey, Rachel & Parker, Rhian, 2013. "Developing a public health policy-research nexus: An evaluation of Nurse Practitioner models in aged care," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 55-63.

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