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How the Economy Works: Confidence, Crashes, and Self-Fulfilling Prophecies

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  • Farmer, Roger

    (University of California, Los Angeles)

Abstract

Of all the economic bubbles that have been pricked,"the editors of The Economist recently observed, few have burst more spectacularly than the reputation of economics itself."Indeed, the financial crisis that crested in 2008 destroyed the credibility of the economic thinking that had guided policymakers for a generation. But what will take its place? In How the Economy Works, one of our leading economists provides a jargon-free exploration of the current crisis, offering a powerful argument for how economics must change to get us out of it. Roger E. A. Farmer traces the swings between classical and Keynesian economics since the early twentieth century, gracefully explaining the elements of both theories. During the Great Depression, Keynes challenged the longstanding idea that an economy was a self-correcting mechanism; but his school gave way to a resurgence of classical economics in the 1970s--a rise that ended with the current crisis. Rather than simply allowing the pendulum to swing back, Farmer writes, we must synthesize the two. From classical economics, he takes the idea that a sound theory must explain how individuals behave--how our collective choices shape the economy. From Keynesian economics, he adopts the principle that markets do not always work well, that capitalism needs some guidance. The goal, he writes, is to correct the excesses of a free-market economy without stifling entrepreneurship and instituting central planning. Recent events have shown that we cannot afford to treat economics as an ivory-tower abstraction. It has a direct impact on our lives by guiding regulators and policymakers as they make decisions with far-reaching practical consequences. Written in clear, accessible language, How the Economy Works makes an argument that no one should ignore.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by Oxford University Press in its series OUP Catalogue with number 9780195397918 and published in 2010.

ISBN: 9780195397918
Order: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780195397918.do
Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195397918

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Cited by:
  1. Roger E.A. Farmer, 2011. "The Stock Market Crash of 2008 Caused the Great Recession: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 17479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Carlos Garcia & Luis González & Alejandro Granda, 2010. "¿Cómo funcionan y se pueden enfrentar los shocks bursátiles en economías abiertas y emergentes?," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv259, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
  3. Shaukat, Mughees & Mirakhor, Abbas & Krichene, Noureddine, 2013. "Fragility Of Interest-Based Debt Financing: Is It Worth Sustaining A Regime Uncertainty?," MPRA Paper 56362, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Carlos Garcia & Andrés Sagner, 2011. "Crédito, Exceso de Toma de Riesgo, Costo del Crédito y Ciclo Económico en Chile," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv271, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
  5. Pengfei Wang & Lifang Xu & Jianjun Miao, 2013. "Stock Market Bubbles and Unemployment," 2013 Meeting Papers 720, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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