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Complex Economic Dynamics - Vol. 1: An Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Market Mechanisms

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  • Richard H. Day

    ()
    (University of Southern California)

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    Abstract

    Richard Day was one of the first economists to recognize the importance of complex dynamics, or chaos theory, in economics and to systematically explore whether a mathematical existence of such behavior could be established in standard models of economic theory. In these two volumes he shows that, far from being a passing fancy in economic research, complex dynamics emerge naturally at the very heart of the subject. The three parts of Volume I form a logical sequence, although each can be read and understood apart from the others. Part I provides a nontechnical introduction to the basic facts of economic change and the theoretical ideas that describe them. Part II surveys the mathematical tools used in subsequent chapters. Part III begins the explanation of microeconomic change in competitive markets in formal theoretical terms. Day's analysis is accompanied by numerous illustrations and examples. Volume II is concerned with macroeconomic dynamics and looks at the economy as a whole. Separate parts are devoted to business cycles, economic growth, and economic development, followed by a survey of the history and current state of dynamic economics. The book concludes with the author's reflection on the implications of complex dynamics for economic theory, for quantitative research, and for government policy.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by The MIT Press in its series MIT Press Books with number 0262041413 and published in 1994.

    Volume: 1
    Edition: 1
    ISBN: 0-262-04141-3
    Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262041413

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    Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu

    Related research

    Keywords: complex economic dynamics; market mechanisms; government policy;

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    Cited by:
    1. Rosser, J. Barkley, 2012. "Emergence and complexity in Austrian economics," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 122-128.
    2. Matsumoto, Akio & Szidarovszky, Ferenc, 2011. "Delay differential neoclassical growth model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 78(3), pages 272-289, May.
    3. J. Barkley Rosser, 1999. "On the Complexities of Complex Economic Dynamics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 169-192, Fall.
    4. Akio Matsumoto & Ferenc Szidarovszky, 2013. "Asymptotic Behavior of a Delay Differential Neoclassical Growth Model ," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(2), pages 440-455, January.
    5. Tuinstra, Jan & Wegener, Michael & Westerhoff, Frank, 2013. "Positive welfare effects of trade barriers in a dynamic equilibrium model," BERG Working Paper Series 91, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    6. John Foster, 2005. "From simplistic to complex systems in economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(6), pages 873-892, November.
    7. Viktor Avrutin & Iryna Sushko & Fabio Tramontana, 2014. "Bifurcation structure in a bimodal piecewise linear business cycle model," DEM Working Papers Series 076, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    8. Uehara, Takuro, 2013. "Ecological threshold and ecological economic threshold: Implications from an ecological economic model with adaptation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 374-384.
    9. Dieci, Roberto & Westerhoff, Frank, 2010. "Interacting cobweb markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 461-481, September.
    10. Hommes, Cars H., 2006. "Heterogeneous Agent Models in Economics and Finance," Handbook of Computational Economics, Elsevier, in: Leigh Tesfatsion & Kenneth L. Judd (ed.), Handbook of Computational Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 23, pages 1109-1186 Elsevier.
    11. Hommes, C.H., 2005. "Heterogeneous Agent Models in Economics and Finance, In: Handbook of Computational Economics II: Agent-Based Computational Economics, edited by Leigh Tesfatsion and Ken Judd , Elsevier, Amsterdam 2006," CeNDEF Working Papers 05-03, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
    12. Westerhoff, Frank & Wieland, Cristian, 2010. "A behavioral cobweb-like commodity market model with heterogeneous speculators," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1136-1143, September.
    13. Richards, Diana & Hays, Jude C., 1998. "Navigating a nonlinear environment: An experimental study of decision making in a chaotic setting," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 281-308, April.
    14. Cars H. Hommes, 2005. "Heterogeneous Agent Models in Economics and Finance," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-056/1, Tinbergen Institute.
    15. Kumaraswamy Velupillai, 2003. "Economics and the complexity vision: chimerical partners or elysian adventurers," Department of Economics Working Papers, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia 0307, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.

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