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Themes in Macroeconomic History

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  • Solomou,Solomos

Abstract

The period between the two World Wars was remarkable; mass unemployment, protectionism, diverse exchange rate regimes, the disintegration of world trade, poor growth prospects and high business cycle volatility. This comprehensive textbook surveys key questions arising from the British economy from 1919 to 1939: Why was unemployment so high? Did a fast transition to the pre-1913 gold parity lead to a low growth equilibrium? Why were interwar business cycles so volatile? Did tariffs stimulate economic recovery in the 1930s? A comparative approach is adopted throughout. For example, the question of gold parity is contrasted with countries that allowed their currencies to depreciate. The book is aimed primarily at students studying economic history. The book continually applies economic theory to historical examples enabling students to evaluate the relevance of competing theoretical frameworks.

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This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521436212 and published in 1996.

Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521436212
Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521436212

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Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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Cited by:
  1. George Chouliarakis, 2003. "Unemployment and Capital Accumulation in Interwar Britain," Economics Discussion Papers 565, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  2. Crafts, Nicholas & Fearon, Peter, 2010. "Lessons from the 1930s' Great Depression," CEPR Discussion Papers 8057, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Colvin, Christopher L. & de Jong, Abe & Fliers, Philip T., 2014. "Predicting the past: Understanding the causes of bank distress in the Netherlands in the 1920s," QUCEH Working Paper Series 14-04, Queen's University Centre for Economic History, Queen's University Belfast.
  4. Vassiliou, E. & Demetriou, I.C., 2005. "An adaptive algorithm for least squares piecewise monotonic data fitting," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 591-609, April.

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