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An Economic History of the English Poor Law, 1750–1850

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  • Boyer,George R.
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    Abstract

    During the last third of the eighteenth century, most parishes in rural southern England adopted policies providing poor relief outside workhouses to unemployed and underemployed able-bodied labourers. The debate over the economic effects of 'outdoor' relief payments to able-bodied workers has continued for over 200 years. This book examines the economic role of the Poor Law in the rural south of England. It presents a model of the agricultural labour market that provides explanations for the widespread adoption of outdoor relief policies, the persistence of such policies until the passage of the Poor Law Amendment Act in 1834, and the sharp regional differences in the administration of relief. The book challenges many commonly held beliefs about the Poor Law and concludes that the adoption of outdoor relief for able-bodied paupers was a rational response by politically dominant farmers to changes in the rural economic environment.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521364799 and published in 1990.

    Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521364799
    Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521364799

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    Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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    Cited by:
    1. Nico Voigtländer & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Why England? Demographic factors, structural change and physical capital accumulation during the Industrial Revolution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 319-361, December.
    2. Masako Kimura & Daishin Yasui, 2012. "Public Policy and the Income-Fertility Relationship in Economic Development," Discussion Papers 1224, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    3. Kauffman, Kyle D., 1997. "Introduction," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 399-403.
    4. Gazeley, Ian & Verdon, Nicola, 2014. "The first poverty line? Davies' and Eden's investigation of rural poverty in the late 18th-century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 94-108.
    5. Schaffner, Julie Anderson, 1995. "Attached farm labor, limited horizons and servility," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 241-270, August.
    6. Walker, Stephen P., 2008. "Accounting, paper shadows and the stigmatised poor," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 33(4-5), pages 453-487.
    7. Masako Kimura & Daishin Yasui, 2012. "Public Policy and the Income-Fertility Relationship in Economic Development," KIER Working Papers 834, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

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