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Status, Fertility, Growth And The Great Transition

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  • FREDERIC TOURNEMAINE

    ()
    (School of Economics, RIPED, University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, 126/1 Vibhavadee-Rangsit Road, Dindaeng, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand)

  • CHRISTOPHER TSOUKIS

    ()
    (Economics, LMBS, London Metropolitan University, 84 Moorgate, London, EC2M 6SQ, UK)

Abstract

We develop an overlapping generation model to examine how the relationship between status concerns, fertility and education affect growth performances. Results are threefold. First, we show that stronger status motives heighten the desire of parents to have fewer but better educated children, which may foster economic development. Second, the government should sometimes postpone the introduction of an economic policy in order to maintain the process of economic development, although such a policy aims to implement the social optimum. Third, status can alter the dynamic path of the economy and help to explain the facts about fertility during the great transition.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd. in its journal The Singapore Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 55 (2010)
Issue (Month): 03 ()
Pages: 553-574

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Handle: RePEc:wsi:serxxx:v:55:y:2010:i:03:p:553-574

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Related research

Keywords: Social status; fertility; education; economic policy; D31; O41;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Frederic Tournemaine & Pongsak Luangaram, 2012. "R&D, human capital, fertility, and growth," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(3), pages 923-953, July.

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