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Voting on public spending: Differences between public employees, transfer recipients, and private workers

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  • Edward M. Gramlich
  • Daniel L. Rubinfeld

Abstract

Politicians who support higher public spending in the hope of gaining the support of transfer recipients, such as the aged, the unemployed, and those on welfare, have no reason to believe that the strategy will succeed; according to the evidence reviewed here, transfer recipients do not vote much differently on such issues from other voters. State and local employees have shown a clear preference for higher public spending, but their numbers are limited and the relative strength of their preference weak, so that their impact on voting outcomes has been only marginal.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/3324780
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

Volume (Year): 1 (1982)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 516-533

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:1:y:1982:i:4:p:516-533

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/34787/home

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Cited by:
  1. Ahlin, A. & Johansson, E., 2000. "Demand for Local Public Schooling: Another Brick in the Wall," Papers 2000:12, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
  2. Saiz, Albert, 2011. "The median voter didn't show up: Costly meetings and insider rents," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 415-425, September.
  3. Magnus Henrekson & Johan Lybeck, 1988. "Explaining the growth of government in Sweden: A disequilibrium approach," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 213-232, June.
  4. Josten, Stefan Dietrich & Truger, Achim, 2003. "The political economy of growth and distribution: A theoretical critique," WSI Discussion Papers 111, Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institut (WSI), Hans-Böckler-Stiftung.
  5. Tonin, Mirco & Vlassopoulos, Michael, 2014. "Are Public Sector Workers Different? Cross-European Evidence from Elderly Workers and Retirees," IZA Discussion Papers 8238, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Ahlin, Åsa & Johansson, Eva, 2001. "Individual demand for local public schooling: Evidence from Swedish survey data," Working Paper Series 2001:1, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  7. Jeffrey S. Zax, 1985. "Municipal Employment, Municipal Unions, and Demand for Municipal Services," NBER Working Papers 1728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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