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The determinants of school attainment in sub-Saharan Africa: A case study of Ghana

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Author Info

  • Paul Glewwe

    (Policy Research Department, The World Bank, Washington, D.C., USA)

  • Nauman Ilias

    (Policy Research Department, The World Bank, Washington, D.C., USA)

Abstract

This paper investigates the factors that determine educational attainment in Ghana. The following specific questions are addressed: 1) What are the relative impacts of economic growth and improvements in school quality on educational attainment? and 2) What policy variables are most effective for reducing the gender gap in educational attainment? We find that economic growth will play the most significant role in raising the school attainment in Ghana in future years. Continued economic growth should also reduce the gender gap substantially. In addition to economic growth, provision of blackboards and repairing of leaking roofs will significantly raise school attainment.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 8 (1996)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 395-413

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:8:y:1996:i:3:p:395-413

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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References

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  1. Rivers, Douglas & Vuong, Quang H., 1988. "Limited information estimators and exogeneity tests for simultaneous probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 347-366, November.
  2. Glewwe, Paul, 1996. "The relevance of standard estimates of rates of return to schooling for education policy: A critical assessment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 267-290, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Pieter Serneels, 2002. "Explaining Non-Negative Duration Dependence Among the Unemployed," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2002-13, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Richard Mussa, 2010. "Rural-Urban Differences in Parental Spending on Children’s Primary Education in Malawi," SALDRU Working Papers 49, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  3. Simon Appleton, 2000. "Education and health at the household level in sub-Saharan Africa," CID Working Papers 33, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  4. Deininger, Klaus, 2003. "Does cost of schooling affect enrollment by the poor? Universal primary education in Uganda," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 291-305, June.
  5. Riddell, Abby, 2012. "The Effectiveness of Foreign Aid to Education: What Can Be Learned?," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  6. Sharada Weir, 2000. "Intergenerational Transfers of Human Capital: Evidence on Two Types of Education Externalities," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2000-15, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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