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Is China turning Latin? China's balancing act between power and dependence in the lead up to global crisis

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  • Andrew Martin Fischer

    (Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Hague, The Netherlands)

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    Abstract

    China's apparent escape from the external constraints of peripheral late industrialisation in the build up to the global economic crisis of 2007-2009 has been recent and remains tenuous. Before its spectacular trade surpluses of the 2000s, China's external accounts reflected many of these constraints. Even in the midst of the surplus surge, external vulnerabilities of a peripheral nature have persisted. Besides the issue of export dependence, which is the conventional focus of most crisis-related studies on China, vulnerabilities have been more profoundly related to the dominance of foreign ownership in China's export sector and to the relatively subordinate position of this export sector within the massive rerouting of international production networks via China that followed the East Asian crisis, in large part led by Northern transnational corporations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 739-757

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:22:y:2010:i:6:p:739-757

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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    1. Barry Naughton, 1996. "China's Emergence and Prospects as a Trading Nation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 273-344.
    2. Yongnian Zheng & Jingtao Yi, 2007. "China's Rapid Accumulation of Foreign Exchange Reserves and Its Policy Implications," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 15(1), pages 14-25.
    3. Prema-chandra Athukorala & Nobuaki Yamashita, 2009. "Global Production Sharing and Sino-US Trade Relations," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 17(3), pages 39-56.
    4. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2007. "The Rise of China and East Asian Export Performance: Is the Crowding-out Fear Warranted?," Departmental Working Papers, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics 2007-10, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    5. Andrew M. Fischer, 2009. "Putting aid in its place: Insights from early structuralists on aid and balance of payments and lessons for contemporary aid debates," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 856-867.
    6. Jan Kregel, 2008. "Financial Flows and International Imbalances--The Role of Catching-up by Late Industrializing Developing Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive, Levy Economics Institute wp_528, Levy Economics Institute.
    7. Shunli Yao, 2009. "Why Are Chinese Exports Not So Special?," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 17(1), pages 47-65.
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    Cited by:
    1. Dic Lo, 2010. "China and World Development beyond the Crisis," Working Papers, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK 167, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
    2. Yongjun Zhao, 2013. "China–Africa development cooperation in the rural sector: an exploration of land tenure and investments linkages for sustainable resource use," Environment, Development and Sustainability, Springer, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 355-366, April.

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