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Early health-related behaviours and their impact on later life chances: evidence from the US

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Author Info

  • Simon M. Burgess

    (Department of Economics, University of Bristol, and Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE, UK)

  • Carol Propper

    (Department of Economics, University of Bristol, and Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE, UK)

Abstract

This paper uses evidence from the US to examine the impact of adolescent illegal consumption and violent behaviour on later life chances. Specifically, we look at the effect of such behaviour by young men in late adolescence on productivity and household formation 10 years on. We find that alcohol and soft drug consumption have no harmful effects on economic prospects in later life. In contrast, hard drug consumption and violent behaviour in adolescence are both associated with lower productivity even by the time the individuals are in their late twenties. These effects are substantial and affect earnings levels and earnings growth. These results are robust to the inclusion of a rich set of additional controls measuring aspects of the individuals' backgrounds. However, we find no evidence of any of these behaviours significantly affecting household formation. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 7 (1998)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 381-399

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:7:y:1998:i:5:p:381-399

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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Cited by:
  1. MacDonald, Ziggy & Pudney, Stephen, 2000. "Illicit drug use, unemployment, and occupational attainment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 1089-1115, November.
  2. Sonia Bhalotra, 2001. "Growth and welfare provisioning: lessons from the English Poor Laws?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 1083-1096.
  3. Jan C. van Ours, 2006. "Cannabis, cocaine and jobs," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(7), pages 897-917.
  4. Jenny Williams & Christopher Skeels, 2006. "The Impact of Cannabis Use on Health," De Economist, Springer, Springer, vol. 154(4), pages 517-546, December.
  5. Ziggy MacDonald & Stephen Pudney, . "Illicit Drug Use and labour Market Achievement: Evidence from the UK," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics, Department of Economics, University of Leicester 98/2, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  6. MacDonald, Ziggy & Shields, Michael A, 2001. "The Impact of Alcohol Consumption on Occupational Attainment in England," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(271), pages 427-53, August.
  7. Ours, J.C. van, 2005. "Cannabis, Cocaine and Jobs," Discussion Paper, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research 2005-15, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  8. Ziggy MacDonald & Michael Shields, . "The Impact of Alcohol Use on Occupational Attainment and Wages," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics, Department of Economics, University of Leicester 98/8, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  9. Shahin Yaqub, 2002. "'Poor children grow into poor adults': harmful mechanisms or over-deterministic theory?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 1081-1093.
  10. Ziggy MacDonald & Stephen Pudney, . "The Wages of Sin? Illegal Drug Use and the Labour Market," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics, Department of Economics, University of Leicester 99/6, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  11. Ziggy MacDonald & Michael A. Shields, 2004. "Does problem drinking affect employment? Evidence from England," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 139-155.
  12. Z. MacDonald & S. Pudney, 2000. "Analysing drug abuse with British Crime Survey data: modelling and questionnaire design issues," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 49(1), pages 95-117.
  13. Hugh Gravelle & Dave Smith, 2001. "Discounting for health effects in cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(7), pages 587-599.

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