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Discrete choice experiments in health economics: a review of the literature

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  • Esther W. de Bekker‐Grob
  • Mandy Ryan
  • Karen Gerard
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 (02)
    Pages: 145-172

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:21:y:2012:i:2:p:145-172

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    Cited by:
    1. Henrik Andersson & Arne Risa Hole & Mikael Svensson, 2014. "Valuation of Small and Multiple Health Risks: A Critical Analysis of SP Data Applied to Food and Water Safety," Working Papers, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics 2014005, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    2. Hansen, Fredrik & Anell, Anders & Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Lyttkens, Carl Hampus, 2013. "The Future of Health Economics: The Potential of Behavioral and Experimental Economics," Working Papers, Lund University, Department of Economics 2013:20, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    3. Catherine L. Kling & Daniel J. Phaneuf & Jinhua Zhao, 2012. "From Exxon to BP: Has Some Number Become Better Than No Number?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 3-26, Fall.
    4. Hong il Yoo & Denise Doiron, 2012. "The use of alternative preference elicitation methods in complex discrete choice experiments," Discussion Papers, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales 2012-16, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    5. Pfarr, Christian, 2012. "Meltzer-Richard and social mobility hypothesis: revisiting the income-redistribution nexus using German choice data," MPRA Paper 43325, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Pfarr, Christian & Schmid, Andreas & Ulrich, Volker, 2013. "You can't always get what you want - East and West Germans' attitudes and preferences regarding the welfare state," MPRA Paper 47240, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ryan, Mandy & Kinghorn, Philip & Entwistle, Vikki A. & Francis, Jill J., 2014. "Valuing patients' experiences of healthcare processes: Towards broader applications of existing methods," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 194-203.
    8. Grisolía, José M. & Longo, Alberto & Boeri, Marco & Hutchinson, George & Kee, Frank, 2013. "Trading off dietary choices, physical exercise and cardiovascular disease risks," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 130-138.

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