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Estimating health insurance impacts under unobserved heterogeneity: the case of Vietnam's health care fund for the poor

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  • Adam Wagstaff

    (Development Research Group, The World Bank, Washington, DC, USA)

Abstract

Vietnam's health care fund for the poor (HCFP) uses government revenues to finance health care for the poor, ethnic minorities living in selected mountainous provinces, and all households living in communes officially designated as highly disadvantaged. As of 2006, the program, which started in 2003, covered around 60% of those eligible. Those who were covered (about 20% of the population) were disproportionately poor, and around 80% of those covered were eligible. Estimates of the program's impact were obtained using a method that takes into account unobserved heterogeneity - including unobserved idiosyncratic returns - but requires minimal assumptions. The downside is that it provides an estimate only of the program's impact on those covered by it; it cannot therefore answer the question of how those currently uncovered will fare when they are eventually covered. The results suggest that HCFP has had no impact on use of services, but has substantially reduced out-of-pocket spending. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1466
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 189-208

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:19:y:2010:i:2:p:189-208

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Acharya, Arnab & Vellakkal, Sukumar & Taylor Fiona & Masset Edoardo & Satija, Ambika & Burke, Margaret & Ebrahim, Shah, 2013. "The impact of health insurance schemes for the informal sector in low- and middle-income countries : a systematic review," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6324, The World Bank.
  2. Faden, Laura & Vialle-Valentin, Catherine & Ross-Degnan, Dennis & Wagner, Anita, 2011. "Active pharmaceutical management strategies of health insurance systems to improve cost-effective use of medicines in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review of current evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 134-143.
  3. Ghislando, S & Manachotphong, W & Perego, VME, 2013. "The impact of Universal Health Coverage on healthcare consumption and risky behaviours: evidence from Thailand," Working Papers 11200, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.
  4. Sparrow, Robert & Suryahadi, Asep & Widyanti, Wenefrida, 2013. "Social health insurance for the poor: Targeting and impact of Indonesia's Askeskin programme," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 264-271.
  5. Wagstaff, Adam, 2007. "Social health insurance reexamined," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4111, The World Bank.
  6. Midori Matsushima & Hiroyuki Yamada, 2013. "Public Health Insurance in Vietnam towards Universal Coverage: Identifying the challenges, issues, and problems in its design and organizational practices," OSIPP Discussion Paper 13E003, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
  7. Landmann, Andreas & Frölich, Markus, 2013. "Can Microinsurance Help Prevent Child Labor? An Impact Evaluation from Pakistan," IZA Discussion Papers 7337, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Chu, Xueling & Chen, Qihui & Fang, Xiangming, 2013. "Can National Health Insurance Programs Improve Health Outcomes?—Re-Examining the Case of the New Cooperative Medical Scheme in Rural China," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150488, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  9. Chu, Xueling & Wei, Longbao & Liu, Donald J., 2010. "The effects of New Cooperative Medicine Scheme coverage on health outcomes and health care in rural China," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61260, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  10. Jeon, Boyoung & Kwon, Soonman, 2013. "Effect of private health insurance on health care utilization in a universal public insurance system: A case of South Korea," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 69-76.
  11. Nguyen Viet Cuong, 2012. "The Impact of Health Insurance for Children:Evidence from Vietnam," Working Papers 33, Development and Policies Research Center (DEPOCEN), Vietnam.

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