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The relationship between education and health behavior: some empirical evidence

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  • Alexander J. Cowell

    (RTI International RTI International is a trade name of Research Triangle Institute. , Research Triangle Park, USA)

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    Abstract

    Although researchers agree that more educated people typically engage in healthier behaviors, they have not uncovered the reason why. This paper considers several explanations, including future opportunity costs. Future opportunity costs represent any utility-improving future outcome that is affected by currently engaging in health-related behavior. This paper also examines whether there are degree effects in the health behaviors of binge drinking and smoking. Results suggest that future opportunity costs may affect smoking, although other interpretations cannot be ruled out. The results also find degree effects with regard to binge drinking. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1019
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 125-146

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:15:y:2006:i:2:p:125-146

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    Cited by:
    1. Rama Pal, 2010. "Analysing Catastrophic OOP Health Expenditure in India: Concepts, Determinants and Policy Implications," Working Papers id:2420, eSocialSciences.
    2. Rama Joglekar, 2008. "Can Insurance Reduce Catastrophic Out-of-Pocket Health Expenditure," Working Papers id:1647, eSocialSciences.
    3. Yusuf, Shahid & Nabeshima, Kaoru & Wei Ha, 2007. "What makes cities healthy ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4107, The World Bank.
    4. Eide, Eric R. & Showalter, Mark H., 2011. "Estimating the relation between health and education: What do we know and what do we need to know?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 778-791, October.
    5. Silles, Mary A., 2009. "The causal effect of education on health: Evidence from the United Kingdom," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 122-128, February.
    6. Fred Pampel & Justin Denney, 2011. "Cross-National Sources of Health Inequality: Education and Tobacco Use in the World Health Survey," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 653-674, May.
    7. Nelson, Jon P., 2014. "Binge Drinking, Alcohol Prices, And Alcohol Taxes," Working Papers 164652, American Association of Wine Economists.
    8. Rama Pal, 2012. "Measuring incidence of catastrophic out-of-pocket health expenditure: with application to India," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 63-85, March.
    9. Padmaja Ayyagari & Daniel Grossman & Frank Sloan, 2011. "Education and health: evidence on adults with diabetes," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 35-54, March.

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