Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The effect of work on mental health: does occupation matter?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Ana Llena-Nozal
  • Maarten Lindeboom
  • France Portrait

Abstract

This paper considers the effect of work choices on mental health and looks at whether this differs across occupations. This requires a model that can deal with the endogeneity in the relationship between health, occupation and work choices. We specify such a model and estimate it on a unique UK panel survey. The survey, called the National Child development Survey (NCDS), follows a cohort since their birth in 1958 until age 42. The analyses show us that early childhood health and ability have long lasting consequences for the mental health at the later ages. Females have lower levels of mental health. Mental health deteriorates with age for males and females, but the rate of deterioration is substantially lower for females. We also find that the rate of depreciation is lower when individuals work. For females we find large effects of occupation, for males we do not find this. Employment status is important for males, but not for females. For both genders we find very large effects of the onset of a long-standing illness. The probability of experiencing such an event depends on employment status, occupation and life style variables. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.929
File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 13 (2004)
Issue (Month): 10 ()
Pages: 1045-1062

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:13:y:2004:i:10:p:1045-1062

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Lindeboom, Maarten & Portrait, France & van den Berg, Gerard J., 2001. "An Econometric Analysis of the Mental-Health Effects of Major Events in the Life of Elderly Individuals," IZA Discussion Papers 398, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. John Bound & Michael Schoenbaum & Todd R. Stinebrickner & Timothy Waidmann, 1998. "The Dynamic Effects of Health on the Labor Force Transitions of Older Workers," NBER Working Papers 6777, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Björklund, Anders, 1984. "Unemployment and Mental Health: Some Evidence from Panel Data," Working Paper Series, Research Institute of Industrial Economics 120, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  4. Janet Currie & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1998. "Health, Health Insurance and the Labor Market," JCPR Working Papers, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research 27, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2000-37 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Bardasi, Elena & Francesconi, Marco, 2000. "The Effect of Non-Standard Employment on Mental Health in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 232, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Sickles, Robin C & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "An Analysis of the Health and Retirement Status of the Elderly," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 54(6), pages 1339-56, November.
  8. Dustmann, Christian & Windmeijer, Frank, 2000. "Wages and the Demand for Health - A Life Cycle Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 171, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Steven Stern, 1989. "Measuring the Effect of Disability on Labor Force Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 361-395.
  10. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  11. Kathryn H. Anderson & Richard V. Burkhauser, 1985. "The Retirement-Health Nexus: A New Measure of an Old Puzzle," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 20(3), pages 315-330.
  12. Martin Browning & Anne Møller Danø & Eskil Heinesen, 2003. "Job Displacement and Health Outcomes: A Representative Panel Study," CAM Working Papers, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics 2003-14, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  13. Anne Case & Angela Fertig & Christina Paxson, 2003. "From Cradle to Grave? The Lasting Impact of Childhood Health and Circumstance," NBER Working Papers 9788, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1982. "Health and Wage: A Simultaneous Equation Model with Multiple Discrete Indicators," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 23(1), pages 199-221, February.
  15. Marcel Kerkhofs & Maarten Lindeboom, 1997. "Age related health dynamics and changes in labour market status," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 407-423.
  16. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Johannesson, Magnus, 2003. "A note on the effect of unemployment on mortality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 505-518, May.
  17. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  18. Sickles, Robin C & Yazbeck, Abdo, 1998. "On the Dynamics of Demand for Leisure and the Production of Health," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(2), pages 187-97, April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. M. Flores & A.S. Kalwij, 2012. "The associations between early life circumstances and later life health and employment in the Netherlands and Spain," Working Papers, Utrecht School of Economics 11-10, Utrecht School of Economics.
  2. Solé, Meritxell & Díaz Serrano, Lluís & Rodríguez, Marisol, 2010. "Work, risk and health: differences between immigrants and natives in Spain," Working Papers 2072/151548, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
  3. Ayyagari Padmaja & Sindelar Jody L, 2010. "The Impact of Job Stress on Smoking and Quitting: Evidence from the HRS," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-32, March.
  4. Ayala, Luis & Rodríguez, Magdalena, 2013. "Health-related effects of welfare-to-work policies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 103-112.
  5. Manuel Flores & Adriaan Kalwij, 2013. "What do wages add to the health-employment nexus? Evidence from older European workers," Documentos de trabajo - Analise Economica, IDEGA - Instituto Universitario de Estudios e Desenvolvemento de Galicia 0054, IDEGA - Instituto Universitario de Estudios e Desenvolvemento de Galicia.
  6. Huber, Martin, 2012. "Identifying causal mechanisms in experiments (primarily) based on inverse probability weighting," Economics Working Paper Series 1213, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, revised May 2013.
  7. Huber, Martin & Lechner, Michael & Wunsch, Conny, 2009. "Does Leaving Welfare Improve Health? Evidence for Germany," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 7421, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Solé, Meritxell & Diaz-Serrano, Luis & Rodriguez Martinez, Marisol, 2010. "Work, Risk and Health: Differences between Immigrants and Natives in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 5338, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Cottini, Elena & Lucifora, Claudio, 2010. "Mental Health and Working Conditions in European Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 4717, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Tefft, Nathan, 2012. "Mental health and employment: The SAD story," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 242-255.
  11. Thomas Barnay, 2014. "Health, Work and Working Conditions: A Review of the European Economic Literature," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1148, OECD Publishing.
  12. Martin Huber, 2010. "Identification of average treatment effects in social experiments under different forms of attrition," University of St. Gallen Department of Economics working paper series 2010, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen 2010-22, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:13:y:2004:i:10:p:1045-1062. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.