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The impact of diabetes on adult employment and earnings of Mexican Americans: Findings from a community based study

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  • Elena Bastida

    (Department of Sociology and Center on Aging and Health, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, The University of Texas-Pan American, USA)

  • José A. Pagán

    (Department of Economics and Finance, College of Business Administration, The University of Texas-Pan American, USA)

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    Abstract

    Epidemiological studies indicate that minority populations in the US - including African Americans, Native Americans and Mexican Americans - are particularly at risk for diabetes and that their complications are more frequent and severe. Using microdata from a 1994-1999 population based study of middle aged and older Mexican Americans in the Southwest, this study analyzes the impact of diabetes on the employment and earnings outcomes of adults 45 years of age and older. The empirical results from estimating maximum likelihood employment and earnings models suggest that diabetes leads to lower productivity and earnings for women but has no statistically significant impact on their employment probability. In the case of men, however, diabetes leads to a lower employment propensity but has no effect on earnings. Thus, the problems associated with this condition could lead to potential future financial difficulties particularly for high-risk populations in their later years. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.676
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 403-413

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:11:y:2002:i:5:p:403-413

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    Cited by:
    1. Linda Dynan, 2009. "The Contribution of Economists to Understanding Racial Health Disparities in the US," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 213-223, September.
    2. H. Shelton Brown & José A. Pagán & Elena Bastida, 2005. "The impact of diabetes on employment: genetic IVs in a bivariate probit," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(5), pages 537-544.
    3. Till Seuring & Yevgeniy Goryakin & Marc Suhrcke, 2014. "The impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico," Working Papers, Centre for Health Economics, University of York 100cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    4. Veronesi, Marcella, 2007. "Environmental Risk Factors, Health and the Labor Market Response of Married Men and Women in the United States," Working Papers, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics 98552, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    5. Zhang, Xiaohui & Zhao, Xueyan & Harris, Anthony, 2009. "Chronic diseases and labour force participation in Australia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 91-108, January.
    6. Bergemann, Annette & Grönqvist, Erik & Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia, 2011. "The effects of job displacement on the onset and progression of diabetes," Annual Conference 2011 (Frankfurt, Main): The Order of the World Economy - Lessons from the Crisis 48695, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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