Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Chemotherapy Administration: Modelling the Costs of Alternative Protocols

Contents:

Author Info

  • Philip Haywood

    (Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia)

  • Johan de Raad

    (Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacotherapy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands)

  • Kees van Gool

    (Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia)

  • Marion Haas

    (Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia)

  • Gisselle Gallego

    (Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia)

  • Sallie-Anne Pearson

    (Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince of Wales Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia)

  • Margaret Faedo

    (Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince of Wales Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia)

  • Robyn Ward

    (Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Prince of Wales Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia)

Abstract

Background and Objective:Background and Objective: The increasing cost of chemotherapy is placing greater pressures on limited healthcare budgets. A potentially important, but often overlooked, aspect of chemotherapy is the cost associated with administration. This study aims to develop a better understanding of these costs, and in doing so, develop a model to estimate the comparative cost of administering alternative chemotherapy protocols for economic evaluation or local decision making. Abstract: Methods:Methods: We identified the potential tasks and choices related to administering intravenous chemotherapy, grouped tasks according to anticipated resource use, and allocated costs to each task using data from an evidence-based collection of cancer protocols or from primary data collection. The resources were costed from a healthcare system perspective using standard data sources within Australia. The model was applied to alternative protocols used in the treatment of three different cancers: locally advanced and metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, adjuvant colorectal cancer and adjuvant breast cancer. Abstract: Results:Results: For the three cancer types examined, the cost of completed administration ranged from 1274 Australian dollars ($A) to $A3015 (year 2009 values) for 13 different protocols potentially used for the initial treatment of locally advanced and metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer; $A5175-8445 for seven protocols for adjuvant colorectal cancer treatment; and $A1494-4074 for seven protocols for adjuvant breast cancer treatment. Abstract: Conclusions:Conclusions: The results are of practical significance to those undertaking economic evaluations and to decision makers who use this information within the area of chemotherapy. The examples used suggest that administration costs per visit varied inversely with the number of visits. The results provide information where little has previously been available and may allow decisions about costs and resource allocation to be made with more certainty. Although our model uses costs from the public health system within an Australian state (New South Wales), it can be adapted for use in other jurisdictions.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://PharmacoEconomics.adisonline.com/pt/re/pec/pdfhandler.00019053-201230120-00007.pdf
Download Restriction: Pay per view

File URL: http://PharmacoEconomics.adisonline.com/pt/re/pec/fulltext.00019053-201230120-00007.htm
Download Restriction: Pay per view

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer Healthcare | Adis in its journal PharmacoEconomics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2012)
Issue (Month): 12 ()
Pages: 1173-1186

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:30:y:2012:i:12:p:1173-1186

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://pharmacoeconomics.adisonline.com/

Related research

Keywords: Antineoplastics; Breast-cancer; Cancer; Carboplatin; Cisplatin; Colorectal-cancer; Cost-allocation; Decision-making; Docetaxel; Gemcitabine; Healthcare-expenditure; Modelling; Non-small-cell-lung-cancer; Paclitaxel; Pemetrexed; Resource-use; Vinorelbine.;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:30:y:2012:i:12:p:1173-1186. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dave Dustin).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.