Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Standardizing the Inclusion of Indirect Medical Costs in Economic Evaluations

Contents:

Author Info

  • Pieter H.M. van Baal

    (National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Expertise Centre for Methodology and Information Services, Bilthoven, the Netherlands; Erasmus University Rotterdam, Institute of Health Policy & Management and Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Rotterdam, the Netherlands)

  • Albert Wong

    (National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Expertise Centre for Methodology and Information Services, Bilthoven, the Netherlands; Tilburg University, Department Tranzo, Tilburg, the Netherlands)

  • Laurentius C.J. Slobbe

    (National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Public Health Forecasting, Bilthoven, the Netherlands)

  • Johan J. Polder

    (Tilburg University, Department Tranzo, Tilburg, the Netherlands; National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Public Health Forecasting, Bilthoven, the Netherlands)

  • Werner B.F. Brouwer

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam, Institute of Health Policy Management and Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Rotterdam, the Netherlands)

  • G. Ardine. de Wit

    (National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, Bilthoven, the Netherlands; Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands)

Abstract

A shortcoming of many economic evaluations is that they do not include all medical costs in life-years gained (also termed indirect medical costs). One of the reasons for this is the practical difficulties in the estimation of these costs. While some methods have been proposed to estimate indirect medical costs in a standardized manner, these methods fail to take into account that not all costs in life-years gained can be estimated in such a way. Costs in life-years gained caused by diseases related to the intervention are difficult to estimate in a standardized manner and should always be explicitly modelled. However, costs of all other (unrelated) diseases in life-years gained can be estimated in such a way. We propose a conceptual model of how to estimate costs of unrelated diseases in life-years gained in a standardized manner. Furthermore, we describe how we estimated the parameters of this conceptual model using various data sources and studies conducted in the Netherlands. Results of the estimates are embedded in a software package called 'Practical Application to Include future Disease costs' (PAID 1.0). PAID 1.0 is available as a Microsoft Excel tool (available as Supplemental Digital Content via a link in this article) and enables researchers to 'switch off' those disease categories that were already included in their own analysis and to estimate future healthcare costs of all other diseases for incorporation in their economic evaluations. We assumed that total healthcare expenditure can be explained by age, sex and time to death, while the relationship between costs and these three variables differs per disease. To estimate values for age- and sex-specific per capita health expenditure per disease and healthcare provider stratified by time to death we used Dutch cost-of-illness (COI) data for the year 2005 as a backbone. The COI data consisted of age- and sex-specific per capita health expenditure uniquely attributed to 107 disease categories and eight healthcare provider categories. Since the Dutch COI figures do not distinguish between costs of those who die at a certain age (decedents) and those who survive that age (survivors), we decomposed average per capita expenditure into parts that are attributable to decedents and survivors, respectively, using other data sources.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://PharmacoEconomics.adisonline.com/pt/re/pec/pdfhandler.00019053-201129030-00002.pdf
Download Restriction: Pay per view

File URL: http://PharmacoEconomics.adisonline.com/pt/re/pec/fulltext.00019053-201129030-00002.htm
Download Restriction: Pay per view

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer Healthcare | Adis in its journal PharmacoEconomics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 175-187

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:29:y:2011:i:3:p:175-187

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://pharmacoeconomics.adisonline.com/

Related research

Keywords: Cost-effectiveness; Indirect-costs.;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:29:y:2011:i:3:p:175-187. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dave Dustin).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.