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Open Space and Public Access: A Contingent Choice Application to Coastal Preservation

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  • Michael P. McGonagle
  • Stephen K. Swallow

Abstract

States and municipalities have committed over $24 billion in bond issues for land conservation in recent years, yet the structure of the land conservation industry and markets is poorly understood. Using a stated choice experiment survey, we examine the role of public access in willingness to pay (WTP) for coastal land conservation. We identify complex patterns in WTP, as related to level of access and to attitudes toward access and environmental protection. Our findings contribute to understanding market segments that may motivate heterogeneity in land conservation agents and that reveal opportunities to optimize conservation programs that serve heterogeneous populations.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 81 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:81:y:2005:i:4:p477-495

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Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Kukielka, Jessica B. & Johnston, Robert J. & Duke, Joshua M., 2008. "Systematic Variation in Willingness to Pay for Agricultural Land Preservation and Implications for Benefit Transfer: A Meta-Analysis," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) 6121, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  2. Duke, Joshua M. & Johnston, Robert J., 2006. "Systematic Influences of Policy Implementation and Conservation Agents on Willingness to Pay for Land Preservation," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) 21234, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Craig E. Landry & Paul Hindsley & Okmyung Bin & Jamie B. Kruse & John C. Whitehead & Ken Wilson, 2011. "Weathering the Storm: Measuring Household Willingness-to-Pay for Risk-Reduction in Post-Katrina New Orleans," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, Southern Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 991-1013, April.
  4. Borchers, Allison M. & Duke, Joshua M. & Parsons, George R., 2007. "Does willingness to pay for green energy differ by source?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 3327-3334, June.
  5. Yong Jiang & Stephen Swallow & Michael Mcgonagle, 2005. "Context-Sensitive Benefit Transfer Using Stated Choice Models: Specification and Convergent Validity for Policy Analysis," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 31(4), pages 477-499, 08.
  6. Halkos, George & Matsiori, Steriani, 2012. "Determinants of willingness to pay for coastal zone quality improvement," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 391-399.
  7. Halkos, George, 2011. "Economic valuation of coastal zone quality improvements," MPRA Paper 35395, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Catalina M. Torres Figuerola & Antoni Riera Font, 2009. "Defining environmental attributes as external costs in choice experiments: A discussion," CRE Working Papers (Documents de treball del CRE), Centre de Recerca Econòmica (UIB ·"Sa Nostra") 2009/1, Centre de Recerca Econòmica (UIB ·"Sa Nostra").
  9. Newell, Laurie W. & Swallow, Stephen K., 2013. "Real-payment choice experiments: Valuing forested wetlands and spatial attributes within a landscape context," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 37-47.

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