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Dads and Daughters: The Changing Impact of Fathers on Women’s Occupational Choices

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  • Judith K. Hellerstein
  • Melinda Sandler Morrill
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    Abstract

    We examine whether women’s rising labor force participation led to increased intergenerational transmission of occupation from fathers to daughters. We develop a model where fathers invest in human capital that is specific to their own occupations. Our model generates an empirical test where we compare the trends in the probabilities that women work in their father’s versus their father-in-law’s occupation. Using data from birth cohorts born between 1909 and 1977, our results indicate that the estimated difference in these trends accounts for at least 13–20 percent of the total increase in the probability that a woman enters her father’s occupation.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 46 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 333-372

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2011:ii:1:p:333-372

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    Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Stefania Marcassa, 2012. "Unemployment Duration of Spouses: Evidence From France," THEMA Working Papers 2012-31, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    2. Azam, Mehtabul, 2013. "Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in India," IZA Discussion Papers 7608, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Olivetti, Claudia & Paserman, M. Daniele, 2013. "In the Name of the Son (and the Daughter): Intergenerational Mobility in the United States, 1850-1930," CEPR Discussion Papers 9372, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Veronika V. Eberharter, 2012. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Occupational Preferences, Segregation, and Wage Inequality: Empirical Evidence from Three Countries," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 506, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Venke Furre Haaland & Mari Rege & Kjetil Telle & Mark Votruba, 2013. "The Intergenerational Transfer of the Gender Gap in Labor Force Participation," CESifo Working Paper Series 4489, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Venke Furre Haaland & Mari Rege & Kjetil Telle & Mark Votruba, 2014. "The intergenerational transfer of the employment gender gap," Discussion Papers 767, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
    7. Veronika V. Eberharter, 2013. "The Intergenerational Dynamics of Social Inequality: Empirical Evidence from Europe and the United States," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 588, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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