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The Impact of HIV/AIDS and ARV Treatment on Worker Absenteeism: Implications for African Firms

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Author Info

  • James Habyarimana
  • Bekezela Mbakile
  • Cristian Pop-Eleches

Abstract

We characterize medium and long-run labor market impacts of HIV/AIDS and ARV treatment using unique panel data of worker absenteeism and information from an AIDS treatment program at a large mining firm in Botswana. We present robust evidence of an inverse-V shaped pattern in worker absenteeism around the time of ARV treatment inception. Absenteeism one to four years after treatment start is low and similar to nonenrolled workers at the firm. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that for the typical manufacturing firm in Africa, the benefits of treatment to the firm cover 8–22 percent of the cost of treatment.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/45/4/809
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 45 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 809-839

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:45:y:2010:i:4:p:809-839

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Malcolm Keswell & Justine Burns & Rebecca Thornton, 2012. "Evaluating the Impact of Health Programmes on Productivity," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 24(4), pages 302-315, December.
  2. Chicoine, Luke, 2012. "AIDS mortality and its effect on the labor market: Evidence from South Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 256-269.
  3. Marinescu, Ioana E., 2012. "HIV, Wages, and the Skill Premium," IZA Discussion Papers 6438, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Arimoto, Yutaka & Ito, Seiro & Kudo, Yuya & Tsukada, Kazunari, 2013. "Stigma, Social Relationship and HIV Testing in the Workplace: Evidence from South Africa," CEI Working Paper Series 2012-06, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  5. James A. Levinsohn & Zoë McLaren & Olive Shisana & Khangelani Zuma, 2011. "HIV Status and Labor Market Participation in South Africa," NBER Working Papers 16901, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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