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Structural Estimation of Family Labor Supply with Taxes: Estimating a Continuous Hours Model Using a Direct Utility Specification

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  • Bradley T. Heim

Abstract

This paper proposes a new method for estimating family labor supply in the presence of taxes. This method accounts for continuous hours choices, measurement error, unobserved heterogeneity in tastes for work, the nonlinear form of the tax code, and fixed costs of work in one comprehensive specification. Estimated on data from the 2001 PSID, the resulting elasticities for married males are consistent with those found elsewhere in the literature but female wage elasticities are substantially smaller than those found in most of the literature. Simulations of recent tax acts predict small effects on the labor supply of married couples.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/44/2/350
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 44 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:44:y:2009:i2:p350-385

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Bastani, Spencer & Selin, Håkan, 2014. "Bunching and non-bunching at kink points of the Swedish tax schedule," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 36-49.
  2. Bargain, Olivier & Orsini, Kristian & Peichl, Andreas, 2011. "Labor Supply Elasticities in Europe and the US," IZA Discussion Papers 5820, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. BARGAIN Olivier & DOLLS Mathias & NEUMANN Dirk & PEICHL Andreas & SIEGLOCH Sebastian, 2011. "Tax-Benefit Systems in Europe and the US: Between Equity and Efficiency," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2011-11, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  4. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia & Tom Kornstad & Thor Olav Thoresen, 2012. "Theoretical and Practical Arguments for Modeling Labor Supply as a Choice among Latent Jobs," CESifo Working Paper Series, CESifo Group Munich 3708, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Robert McClelland & Shannon Mok, 2012. "A Review of Recent Research on Labor Supply Elasticities: Working Paper 2012-12," Working Papers, Congressional Budget Office 43675, Congressional Budget Office.
  6. Bargain, Olivier & Orsini, Kristian & Peichl, Andreas, 2012. "Comparing Labor Supply Elasticities in Europe and the US: New Results," IZA Discussion Papers 6735, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Olivier Bargain & Andreas Peichl, 2013. "Steady-State Labor Supply Elasticities: An International Comparison," Working Papers, HAL halshs-00805744, HAL.
  8. Peichl, Andreas & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2012. "Accounting for labor demand effects in structural labor supply models," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 129-138.

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