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Sorting in the Labor Market: Do Gregarious Workers Flock to Interactive Jobs?

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  • Alan B. Krueger
  • David Schkade

Abstract

This paper tests a central implication of the theory of equalizing differences, that workers sort into jobs with different attributes based on their preferences. We present evidence from four new time-use data sets for the United States and France suggesting that workers who are more gregarious, as revealed by their behavior when they are not working, tend to be employed in jobs that involve more social interactions. We also find that workers report substantially higher levels of job satisfaction and net affect while at work if their jobs entail frequent interactions with coworkers and other desirable working conditions.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 43 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:43:y:2008:i4:p859-883

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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  1. Saffer, Henry, 2008. "The demand for social interaction," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1047-1060, June.
  2. Borghans,Lex & Weel,Bas,ter & Weinberg,Bruce A., 2005. "People People: Social Capital and the Labor-Market - Outcomes of Underrepresented Groups," Research Memorandum 002, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  3. Scott Stern, 2004. "Do Scientists Pay to Be Scientists?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(6), pages 835-853, June.
  4. Richard B. Freeman, 1977. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," NBER Working Papers 0225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Krueger, Alan B. & Schkade, David A., 2008. "The reliability of subjective well-being measures," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(8-9), pages 1833-1845, August.
  6. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1990. "Shirking or productive schmoozing: Wages and the allocation of time at work," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 43(3), pages 121-133, February.
  7. W. Kip Viscusi & Joni Hersch, 2001. "Cigarette Smokers As Job Risk Takers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 269-280, May.
  8. Brown, Charles, 1980. "Equalizing Differences in the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 94(1), pages 113-34, February.
  9. John F. Helliwell & Haifang Huang, 2010. "How’s the Job? Well-Being and Social Capital in the Workplace," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(2), pages 205-227, January.
  10. Gronau, Reuben, 1974. "Wage Comparisons-A Selectivity Bias," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1119-43, Nov.-Dec..
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Michelle Tan, 2009. "Noncognitive Skills, Occupational Attainment, and Relative Wages," CEPR Discussion Papers 612, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  2. Robert Dur & Joeri Sol, 2008. "Social Interaction, Co-Worker Altruism, and Incentives," CESifo Working Paper Series 2476, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Sabrina Teyssier, 2008. "Les Modes de Rémunération comme MécanismesSélectifs de la Main d'oeuvre : Fondements Théoriques et Estimations Empiriques," Post-Print halshs-00303703, HAL.
  4. Antonio Cabrales & Raffaele Miniaci & Marco Piovesan & Giovanni Ponti, 2009. "Social Preferences and Strategic Uncertainty: An Experiment on Markets and Contracts," Working Papers 2009-09, FEDEA.
  5. Joseph Sabia & Daniel Rees, 2012. "Does the number of sex partners affect educational attainment? Evidence from female respondents to the Add Health," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 89-118, January.
  6. Shelly Lundberg, 2011. "Psychology and Family Economics," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(s1), pages 66-81, 05.
  7. Arnaud Dupuy & Wendy Smits, 2010. "How large is the compensating wage differential for R&D workers?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(5), pages 423-436.
  8. Ozkan Eren & I. Serkan Ozbeklik, 2010. "Leadership Skills and Wages Revisited: Is There a Causal Relation?," Working Papers 1002, University of Nevada, Las Vegas , Department of Economics.
  9. repec:ese:iserwp:2009-22 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Friedhelm Pfeiffer & Nico Schulz, 2012. "Gregariousness, interactive jobs and wages," Journal of Labour Market Research, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 147-159, July.
  11. Pablo Ruiz-Palomino & Francisco Sáez-Martínez & Ricardo Martínez-Cañas, 2013. "Understanding Pay Satisfaction: Effects of Supervisor Ethical Leadership on Job Motivating Potential Influence," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 118(1), pages 31-43, November.
  12. Antecol, Heather & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2013. "Do psychosocial traits help explain gender segregation in young people's occupations?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 59-73.
  13. Nils Braakmann, 2013. "What Determines Wage Inequality Among Young German University Graduates?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 233(2), pages 130-158, March.
  14. repec:dgr:uvatin:2008094 is not listed on IDEAS

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