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Parental Effort, School Resources, and Student Achievement

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  • Andrew J. Houtenville
  • Karen Smith Conway
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    Abstract

    This article investigates an important factor in student achievement—parental involvement. Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS), we estimate a value-added education production function that includes parental effort as an input. Parental effort equations are also estimated as a function of child, parent, household, and school characteristics. Our results suggest that parental effort has a strong positive effect on achievement that is large relative to the effect of school resources and is not captured by family background variables. Parents appear to reduce their effort in response to increased school resources, suggesting potential "crowding out" of school resources.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 43 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 437-453

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:43:y:2008:i:2:p:437-453

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    Cited by:
    1. Fanti, Luciano & Gori, Luca, 2011. "Child policy ineffectiveness in an overlapping generations small open economy with human capital accumulation and public education," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 404-409.
    2. De Witte, Kristof & Geys, Benny & Solondz, Catharina, 2014. "Public expenditures, educational outcomes and grade inflation: Theory and evidence from a policy intervention in the Netherlands," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 152-166.
    3. Sass, Tim R. & Semykina, Anastasia & Harris, Douglas N., 2014. "Value-added models and the measurement of teacher productivity," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 9-23.
    4. Rønning, Marte, 2011. "Who benefits from homework assignments?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 55-64, February.
    5. Fredriksson, Peter & Öckert, Björn & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 2014. "Inside the Black Box of Class Size: Mechanisms, Behavioral Responses, and Social Background," IZA Discussion Papers 8019, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Gelber, Alexander & Isen, Adam, 2013. "Children's schooling and parents' behavior: Evidence from the Head Start Impact Study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 25-38.
    7. Ferreyra, Maria Marta & Liang, Pierre Jinghong, 2012. "Information asymmetry and equilibrium monitoring in education," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 237-254.
    8. Tim Krieger & Jens Ruhose, 2013. "Honey, I shrunk the kids’ benefits—revisiting intergenerational conflict in OECD countries," Public Choice, Springer, Springer, vol. 157(1), pages 115-143, October.
    9. Tobing, Elwin, 2011. "Taxation, human capital formation, and long-run growth with private investment in education," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 48-60, February.
    10. Haelermans, Carla & De Witte, Kristof, 2012. "The role of innovations in secondary school performance – Evidence from a conditional efficiency model," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 223(2), pages 541-549.
    11. Walsh, Patrick, 2010. "Is parental involvement lower at larger schools?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 959-970, December.
    12. Harris, Douglas N. & Sass, Tim R., 2011. "Teacher training, teacher quality and student achievement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 798-812.
    13. Luis Fernando Gamboa & Mauricio Rodríguez-Acosta & Andrés Felipe García-Suaza, 2010. "Academic achievement in sciences: the role of preferences and educative assets," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO 006701, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
    14. Chowa, Gina A.N. & Masa, Rainier D. & Tucker, Jenna, 2013. "The effects of parental involvement on academic performance of Ghanaian youth: Testing measurement and relationships using structural equation modeling," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 2020-2030.
    15. Kristen Capogrossi & Wen You, 2013. "Academic Performance and Childhood Misnourishment: A Quantile Approach," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 141-156, June.
    16. Marte Rønning, 2008. "Who benefits from homework assignments?," Discussion Papers, Research Department of Statistics Norway 566, Research Department of Statistics Norway.

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