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Cognitive Development among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health, and Parenting

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  • Christina Paxson
  • Norbert Schady

Abstract

We examine the relationship between early cognitive development, socioeconomic status (SES), child health, and parenting quality in a developing country. We use a sample of more than 3,000 predominantly poor preschool-aged children from Ecuador, and analyze determinants of their scores on a widely used test of language ability. We find that household wealth and parental education are associated with higher scores, and that these associations are larger among older children. Child health and measures of parenting quality are associated with test performance, and account for a fraction, although not the majority, of the association between SES and cognitive development.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 42 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:42:y:2007:i1:p49-84

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