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Informal Care and the Division of End-of-Life Transfers

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  • Meta Brown
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    Abstract

    Unmarried parents in the AHEAD study derive the majority of their longterm care hours from their children, and childcaregivers are generally unpaid. This paper examines the extent to which the division of end-of-life transfers compensates caregiving children. In a model of siblings’ altruistic contribution of care to a shared parent, the parent’s estate division is found to influence total family care, even where care contingencies are unenforced. Evidence in the AHEAD data that end-of-life transfers favor both current and expected caregivers, and that children make altruistic but resourceconstrained caregiving decisions, is consistent with a theory of estate division in which planned end-of-life transfers elicit care from altruistic children.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:41:y:2006:i:1:p191-219

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    Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Meghan Skira, 2012. "Dynamic Wage and Employment Effects of Elder Parent Care," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 792, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 16 Aug 2013.
    2. Joris Ghysels, 2011. "The provision of informal childcare by European grandparents: constraints versus selective preferences," Working Papers 1108, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    3. Michelle Sovinsky & Steven Stern, 2013. "Dynamic modelling of long-term care decisions," ECON - Working Papers 113, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    4. Olena Nizalova, 2012. "The Wage Elasticity of Informal Care Supply: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 350-366, October.

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