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A Sibling Study of Stepchild Well-being

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  • Eirik Evenhouse
  • Siobhan Reilly

Abstract

Examining 33 indicators of well-being from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we conclude that stepchildren’ s inferior outcomes are not entirely explained by sample selection. Using sibling comparisons to control for unobserved family characteristics, we identify stepparent effects by comparing half-siblings in families in which one child has both parents and the other a parent and stepparent. Most estimated effects retain their sign after differencing across siblings, and a third remain statistically significant. The estimates’ sensitivity to the choice of indicator suggests that studies based on a single measure of child wellbeing may be misleading.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/XXXIX/1/248
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 39 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:39:y:2004:i:1:p248-276

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Terry-Ann Craigie, 2008. "Effects of Paternal Presence and Family Stability on Child Cognitive Performance," Working Papers, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing. 1015, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
  2. Maria Cancian & Daniel Meyer & Steven Cook, 2011. "The Evolution of Family Complexity from the Perspective of Nonmarital Children," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 957-982, August.
  3. Marcia J. Carlson & Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr., 2007. "The Consequences Of Multi-Partnered Fertility For Parental Involvement And Relationships," Working Papers, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing. 908, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
  4. Sundström, Marianne, 2013. "Growing up in a blended family or a stepfamily: What is the impact on education?," Working Paper Series, Swedish Institute for Social Research 2/2013, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

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