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Recruiting Smarter Teachers

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  • Dale Ballou
  • Michael Podgursky

Abstract

In recent years many states have raised teacher salaries to attract more capable teachers. Since teacher labor markets are typically in a state of excess supply, success of such policies is contingent on containing perverse feedbacks which arise among exit decisions, vacancy rates, and the willingness of prospective teachers to invest in occupation-specific human capital. Using SAT scores as a measure of ability, we find that an across-the-board raise produces modest improvements in the work force at best. Indeed, under plausible parameter values, it is possible for mean ability to decline.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 30 (1995)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 326-338

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:30:y:1995:i:2:p:326-338

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Aashish Mehta & Hector Villarreal, 2008. "Why do diplomas pay? An expanded Mincerian framework applied to Mexico," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(24), pages 3127-3144.
  2. McIntosh, Steven & Arnaud Chevalier & Peter Dolton, 2003. "Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in the UK: An Analysis of Graduate Occupation Choice from the 1960s to the 1990s," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003, Royal Economic Society 151, Royal Economic Society.
  3. Strauss, Robert P. & Bowes, Lori R. & Marks, Mindy S. & Plesko, Mark R., 2000. "Improving teacher preparation and selection: lessons from the Pennsylvania experience," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 387-415, October.
  4. Buddin, Richard & Zamarro, Gema, 2009. "Teacher qualifications and student achievement in urban elementary schools," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 103-115, September.
  5. Roger T. Severino & Robert P. Strauss, 2005. "Improving public education through strengthened local control," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 73-112.
  6. Sandra Pianalto, 2005. "Education and economic development: beginning a dialogue," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 1-4.
  7. Clotfelter, Charles & Glennie, Elizabeth & Ladd, Helen & Vigdor, Jacob, 2008. "Would higher salaries keep teachers in high-poverty schools? Evidence from a policy intervention in North Carolina," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1352-1370, June.
  8. Reback, RandallRandall, 2004. "The impact of college course offerings on the supply of academically talented public school teachers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 377-404.
  9. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2004. "To Teach or not to Teach? Panel Data Evidence on the Quitting Decision," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series, The University of Melbourne 916, The University of Melbourne.
  10. Eric A. Hanushek & Steven G. Rivkin, 1996. "Understanding the 20th Century Growth in U.S. School Spending," NBER Working Papers 5547, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Sander, William, 2008. "Teacher quality and earnings," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 307-309, May.
  12. Martin, Stephanie M., 2010. "The determinants of school district salary incentives: An empirical analysis of, where and why," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1143-1153, December.
  13. Brian Jacob & Jens Ludwig, 2008. "Improving Educational Outcomes for Poor Children," NBER Working Papers 14550, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Leigh, Andrew, 2012. "Teacher pay and teacher aptitude," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 41-53.
  15. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 1999. "Do Higher Salaries Buy Better Teachers?," NBER Working Papers 7082, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Eric A. Hanushek, 1996. "Measuring Investment in Education," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 9-30, Fall.

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