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Employment of New Mothers and Child Care Choice: Differences by Children's Age

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  • Arleen Leibowitz
  • Jacob Alex Klerman
  • Linda J. Waite
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    Abstract

    This paper examines a woman's decisions about when to return to market work in the two years following childbirth and the type of child care she chooses. Own wages relate positively to an early return to work, while higher family income delays return to work. Wages and income did not significantly affect choice of market versus nonmarket child care. Greater child care tax credits increased early return to work (within three months) but had little effect on later labor supply. Contrary to expectations, tax credits did not affect child care choice, but predicted early market reentry.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 27 (1992)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 112-133

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:27:y:1992:i:1:p:112-133

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    Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Troske, Kenneth & Voicu, Alexandru, 2004. "Joint Estimation of Sequential Labor Force Participation and Fertility Decisions Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Techniques," IZA Discussion Papers 1251, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Kenneth Troske & Alexandru Voicu, 2013. "The effect of the timing and spacing of births on the level of labor market involvement of married women," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 483-521, August.
    3. Kristin E. Smith, 2014. "The Ups and Downs in Women's Employment: Shifting Composition or Behavior from 1970 to 2010?," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 14-211, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Graafland, Johan J., 2000. "Childcare subsidies, labour supply and public finance: an AGE approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 209-246, April.
    5. Katrin Sommerfeld, 2009. "Older Babies - More Active Mothers? How Maternal Labor Supply Changes as the Child Grows," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(2), pages 227-240.
    6. Orman, Cuneyt & Goksel, Turkmen & Gurdal, Mehmet Y, 2011. "The Baby Boom, Baby Busts, and Grandmothers," MPRA Paper 28782, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Charles Baum, 2002. "A dynamic analysis of the effect of child care costs on the work decisions of low-income mothers with infants," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 139-164, February.
    8. Davia, María A. & Legazpe, Nuria, 2012. "Decisiones laborales de las mujeres casadas o cohabitantes en España/Employment Decisions of Married or Cohabiting Women in Spain," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 1065 (22pag, Diciembre.
    9. Fazeer Rahim, 2014. "Work-family attitudes and career interruptions due to childbirth," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 177-205, March.
    10. Ghazala Naz, 2004. "The impact of cash-benefit reform on parents’ labour force participation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 369-383, 06.
    11. Troske, Kenneth & Voicu, Alexandru, 2009. "The Effect of Children on the Level of Labor Market Involvement of Married Women: What is the Role of Education?," IZA Discussion Papers 4074, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2014. "The causal effects of the number of children on female employment-do European institutional and gender conditions matter?," Working Papers 64, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    13. Jonah B. Gelbach, 2002. "Public Schooling for Young Children and Maternal Labor Supply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 307-322, March.

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