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Why So Many Children of Doctors Become Doctors: Nepotism vs. Human Capital Transfers

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  • Bernard F. Lentz
  • David N. Laband

Abstract

In this paper we document a statistically significant, marginally greater probability of admittance into (at least one) medical school for children of doctors as compared to children of non-doctors. This fact can plausibly be explained as resulting from nepotism, in various forms, as well as from human capital transfers from first to (would-be) second generation doctors. After controlling for acquired human capital and other attributes of medical school applicants, we cannot reject nepotism as a cause-children of doctors are nearly 14 percent more likely to be admitted into medical school than are comparable nonfollowers.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 24 (1989)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 396-413

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:24:y:1989:i:3:p:396-413

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Mehmet Bac & Eren Inci, 2010. "The Old‐Boy Network and the Quality of Entrepreneurs," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(4), pages 889-918, December.
  2. Donald Andrews & Bichaka Fayissa & Uday Tate, 1991. "An estimation of the aggregate educational production function for public schools in Louisiana," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 25-47, September.
  3. Ponzo, Michela & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2010. "The use of informal networks in Italy: Efficiency or favoritism?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 89-99, January.
  4. Gevrek, Deniz & Gevrek, Z. Eylem, 2008. "Nepotism, Incentives and the Academic Success of College Students," IZA Discussion Papers 3711, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Veronika V. Eberharter, 2013. "The Intergenerational Dynamics of Social Inequality: Empirical Evidence from Europe and the United States," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 588, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  6. Bodo Knoll & Nadine Riedel & Eva Schlenker, 2013. "He's a Chip Off the Old Block - The Persistence of Occupational Choices Across Generations," CESifo Working Paper Series 4428, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Peter A. Groothuis & Jana D. Groothuis, 2006. "Nepotism or Family Tradition?: A Study of NASCAR Drivers," Working Papers 06-11, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  8. Harry Holzer & David Neumark, 1999. "Assessing Affirmative Action," NBER Working Papers 7323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Tacsir, Ezequiel, 2010. "Occupation Choice: Family, Social and Market Influences," MERIT Working Papers 013, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  10. Kathy Cannings & Sophie Mahseredjian & Claude Montmarquette, 1994. "Entrance Quotas and Admission to Medical Schools: A Sequential Probit Model," CIRANO Working Papers 94s-10, CIRANO.
  11. Ponzo, Michela & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2008. "The Use of Informal Networks in Italian Labor Markets: Efficiency or Favoritisms?," MPRA Paper 11764, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Sorgner, Alina & Fritsch, Michael, 2013. "Stepping Forward: Personality Traits, Choice of Profession, and the Decision to Become Self-Employed," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79768, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  13. Bodo Knoll & Nadine Riedel & Eva Schlenker, 2013. "He's a Chip Off the Old Block: The Persistency of Occupational Choices among Generations," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 561, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  14. Vincenzo Scoppa, 2009. "Intergenerational transfers of public sector jobs: a shred of evidence on nepotism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 167-188, October.
  15. O'Flaherty, Brendan & Sethi, Rajiv, 2010. "The racial geography of street vice," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 270-286, May.

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