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Precautionary Saving, Insurance, and the Origins of Workers' Compensation

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  • Kantor, Shawn Everett
  • Fishback, Price V

Abstract

In this article, the authors test whether the introduction of social insurance has led to a reduction in private insurance purchases and precautionary saving by examining the introduction of workers' compensation. Their empirical analysis is based on the financial decisions of over 7,000 households surveyed for the 1917-19 Bureau of Labor Statistics cost-of-living study. The authors find that the presence of workers' compensation at least partially crowded out private accident insurance and led to a substantial reduction in precautionary saving. The introduction of workers' compensation caused private saving to fall by approximately 25 percent, with other factors held constant. Copyright 1996 by University of Chicago Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 104 (1996)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 419-42

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:104:y:1996:i:2:p:419-42

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/

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Cited by:
  1. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2003. "The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1373-1384, September.
  2. Meiling Ying & Zaichao Du, 2012. "The effects of medical insurance on durables consumption in rural China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 176-187, May.
  3. Alan de BROMHEAD & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "Immigration and the demand for life insurance: Evidence from Canada, 1911," Trinity Economics Papers tep1511, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  4. Shin-Yi Chou & Jin-Tan Liu & James Hammitt, 2006. "Households’ precautionary behaviors—the effects of the introduction of National Health Insurance in Taiwan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 395-421, December.
  5. Emery, J.C. Herbert, 2010. ""Un-American" or unnecessary? America's rejection of compulsory government health insurance in the Progressive Era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 68-81, January.
  6. Chou, Shin-Yi & Liu, Jin-Tan & Hammitt, James K., 2003. "National Health Insurance and precautionary saving: evidence from Taiwan," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(9-10), pages 1873-1894, September.
  7. Shin-Yi Chou & Jin-Tan Liu & James K. Hammitt, 2002. "Health Insurance and Households' Precautionary Behaviors - An Unusual Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 9394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Di Matteo, Livio & Herbert Emery, J. C., 2002. "Wealth and the demand for life insurance: evidence from Ontario, 1892," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 446-469, October.
  9. James, J.A. & Palumbo, M.G. & Thomas, M., 1998. "Consumption Smoothing Among Working-Class American Families Before Social Insurance," Papers 98-05, Houston - Department of Economics.
  10. Makki, Shiva S. & Miranda, Mario J., 1998. "Self-Insurance And The Utility Of Standard Risk Management Contracts," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20975, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  11. Terada-Hagiwara, Akiko, 2009. "Explaining Filipino Households’ Declining Saving Rate," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 178, Asian Development Bank.
  12. Bai, Chong-En & Wu, Binzhen, 2014. "Health insurance and consumption: Evidence from China’s New Cooperative Medical Scheme," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 450-469.
  13. J.C. Herbert Emery, 2008. "America’s Rejection of Compulsory Government Health Insurance in the Progressive Era and its Legacy for National Insurance Today," Working Papers 2008-23, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 01 Apr 2008.
  14. Gottlieb, Daniel, 2007. "Asymmetric information in late 19th century cooperative insurance societies," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 270-292, April.
  15. Saito, Makoto & Shiratsuka, Shigenori, 2003. "Precautionary Motives versus Waiting Options: Evidence from Aggregate Household Saving in Japan," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 21(3), pages 1-20, October.

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