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The Impact of Rosenwald Schools on Black Achievement

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  • Daniel Aaronson
  • Bhashkar Mazumder

Abstract

The black-white gap in schooling among southern-born men narrowed sharply between the world wars. From 1914 to 1931, nearly 5,000 schools were constructed as part of the Rosenwald Rural Schools Initiative. Using census data and World War II records, we find that the Rosenwald program accounts for a sizable portion of the educational gains of rural southern blacks. We find significant effects on school attendance, literacy, years of schooling, cognitive test scores, and northern migration. The gains are highest in the most disadvantaged counties, suggesting that schooling treatments have the largest impact among those with limited access to education.

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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/662962
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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/662962
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 119 (2011)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 821 - 888

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:doi:10.1086/662962

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/

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Cited by:
  1. Ricardo Mora & Iliana Reggio, 2012. "Treatment effect identification using alternative parallel assumptions," Economics Working Papers we1233, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  2. Bhash Mazumder, 2011. "Black-white differences in intergenerational economic mobility in the US," Working Paper Series WP-2011-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. Melvin Stephens, Jr. & Dou-Yan Yang, 2013. "Compulsory Education and the Benefits of Schooling," NBER Working Papers 19369, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Carruthers, Celeste K. & Wanamaker, Marianne H., 2013. "Closing the gap? The effect of private philanthropy on the provision of African-American schooling in the U.S. south," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 53-67.
  5. David Frisvold & Ezra Golberstein, 2010. "The Effect of School Quality on Black-White Health Differences: Evidence from Segregated Southern Schools," Emory Economics 1013, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
  6. Daniel Aaronson & Fabian Lange & Bhash Mazumder, 2011. "Fertility transitions along the extensive and intensive margins," Working Paper Series WP-2011-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

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