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Manipulation of the Commodity Futures Market Delivery Process

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  • Pirrong, Stephen Craig
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    Abstract

    An analysis of the futures market delivery 'end game' specifies necessary and sufficient conditions for long and short traders to manipulate futures prices at contract expiration. The empirical and welfare implications of manipulation are derived as well. Manipulation is most likely to occur in markets where economic frictions (such as transportation and transactions costs) make it inefficient to return excessive deliveries to their original owners. These consumption distortions induce price changes that favor manipulators. Manipulation may also occur in markets where such costs are unimportant but the necessary conditions for the manipulation of a frictionless market are very restrictive. Copyright 1993 by University of Chicago Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Business.

    Volume (Year): 66 (1993)
    Issue (Month): 3 (July)
    Pages: 335-69

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jnlbus:v:66:y:1993:i:3:p:335-69

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JB/

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    Cited by:
    1. Tālis J. Putniņš, 2012. "Market Manipulation: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(5), pages 952-967, December.
    2. Cumming, D. & Johan, S.A., 2008. "Global market surveillance," Discussion Paper 2008-002, Tilburg University, Tilburg Law and Economic Center.
    3. Merrick, John Jr & Naik, Narayan Y. & Yadav, Pradeep K., 2005. "Strategic trading behavior and price distortion in a manipulated market: anatomy of a squeeze," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 171-218, July.
    4. Owen Lamont, 2004. "Go Down Fighting: Short Seller vs. Firms," Yale School of Management Working Papers amz2521, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Aug 2004.
    5. Cumming, Douglas & Johan, Sofia & Li, Dan, 2011. "Exchange trading rules and stock market liquidity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 651-671, March.
    6. Lien, Donald & Tse, Yiu Kuen, 2006. "A survey on physical delivery versus cash settlement in futures contracts," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 15-29.
    7. Aitken, Michael & Cumming, Douglas & Zhan, Feng, 2013. "Exchange trading rules, surveillance and insider trading," CFS Working Paper Series 2013/15, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).

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