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Employment, Motherhood, and School Continuation Decisions of Young White, Black, and Hispanic Women

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Author Info

  • Avner Ahituv

    (Hebrew University)

  • Marta Tienda

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

We examine the empirical relationship between early employment activity and school continuation decisions for young American women using a dynamic, sequential discrete-choice framework that estimates schooling, labor supply, and birth decisions jointly, controlling for unobserved heterogeneity and the endogeneity of these life cycle decisions. That the rate of school withdrawal increases as work intensity rises helps explain the higher departure rates of Hispanic girls from secondary school and the premature departure of young black women from college. The disturbing implication is that youth employment induces long-run wage stagnation for early school leavers and potentially increases race and ethnic inequities.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 22 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 115-158

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:22:y:2004:i:1:p:115-158

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. Jennie Brand & Dwight Davis, 2011. "The Impact of College Education on Fertility: Evidence for Heterogeneous Effects," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 863-887, August.
  2. Fairlie, Robert W., 2005. "The effects of home computers on school enrollment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 533-547, October.
  3. Denice Cavero & Verónica Montalva & José Rodríguez, 2011. "Determinantes socioeconómicos de las transiciones entre niveles educativos: un enfoque sobre género y ruralidad en el Perú," Documentos de Trabajo 2011-309, Departamento de Economía - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
  4. Avner Ahituv & Robert Lerman, 2011. "Job turnover, wage rates, and marital stability: How are they related?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 221-249, June.
  5. Naccarato, Toni & Brophy, Megan & Courtney, Mark E., 2010. "Employment outcomes of foster youth: The results from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Foster Youth," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 551-559, April.

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