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Family Structure, Home Time Demands, and the Employment Patterns of Japanese Married Women

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  • Ogawa, Naohiro
  • Ermisch, John F

Abstract

A recent (1990) national survey is used in an econometric analysis of Japanese women's hourly pay and employment patterns. It confirms many results from Western industrial countries but also indicates the important influence of Japan's unique family structure, the persistence of multigenerational households, on married women's employment patterns. Younger married women are more likely to take paid employment in such households, particularly on a full-time basis, than in nuclear family households. This appears to reflect in part the child-care role played by the women's parents or parents-in-law. Copyright 1996 by University of Chicago Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 14 (1996)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 677-702

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:14:y:1996:i:4:p:677-702

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Cited by:
  1. Abe, Yukiko, 2013. "Regional variations in labor force behavior of women in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 112-124.
  2. Robert Clark & Rikiya Matsukura & Naohiro Ogawa, 2013. "Low fertility, human capital, and economic growth," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(32), pages 865-884, October.
  3. Shinya Sugawara & Jiro Nakamura, 2014. "Can Formal Elderly Care Stimulate Female Labor Supply? The Japanese Experience," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-924, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  4. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2002. "The Decision to Work by Married Immigrant Women: The Role of Extended Family Households," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2002-34, Claremont Colleges.
  5. Abe, Yukiko, 2011. "The Equal Employment Opportunity Law and labor force behavior of women in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 39-55, March.
  6. Mano, Yukichi & Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "The Influence of a wife’s working status on her husband’s accumulation of human capital," MPRA Paper 37247, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Abe, Yukiko, 2011. "Regional variations in labor force behavior of women in Japan," CEI Working Paper Series 2010-12, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  8. Bruno Arpino & Chiara D. Pronzato & Lara P. Tavares, 2012. "Mothers’ labour market participation: Do grandparents make it easier?," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 277, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  9. Dimova, Ralitza & Wolff, François-Charles, 2006. "Do Downward Private Transfers Enhance Maternal Labor Supply? Evidence from around Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 2469, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Ono, Hiroshi & Rebick, Marcus, 2002. "Impediments to the Productive Employment of Labor in Japan," Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 500, Stockholm School of Economics.
  11. Hiroshi Ono & Marcus Rebick, 2003. "Constraints on the Level and Efficient Use of Labor," NBER Chapters, in: Structural Impediments to Growth in Japan, pages 225-258 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Naohiro Ogawa & Andrew Mason & Amonthep Chawla & Rikiya Matsukura, 2010. "Japan’s Unprecedented Aging and Changing Intergenerational Transfers," NBER Chapters, in: The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 19, pages 131-160 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Arnstein Aassve & Bruno Arpino & Alice Goisis, 2012. "Grandparenting and mothers’ labour force participation: A comparative analysis using the Generations and Gender Survey," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(3), pages 53-84, July.
  14. Bessho, Shun-ichiro & Hayashi, Masayoshi, 2005. "Economic studies of taxation in Japan: The case of personal income taxes," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 956-972, December.
  15. Hiroyuki Okamuro & Kenta Ikeuchi, 2012. "Work-Life Balance and Gender Differences in Self-Employment Income during the Start-up Stage in Japan," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd12-260, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  16. Prieto-Rodriguez, Juan & Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Cesar, 2003. "Participation of married women in the European labor markets and the "added worker effect"," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 429-446, September.

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