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The Impact of Low-Skilled Immigration on the Youth Labor Market

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  • Christopher L. Smith
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    Abstract

    The employment to population rate of high school–aged youth has fallen by about 20 percentage points since the late 1980s. One potential explanation is increased competition from substitutable labor, such as immigrants. I demonstrate that the increase in the population of less educated immigrants has had a considerably more negative effect on employment outcomes for native youth than for native adults. At least two factors are at work: there is greater overlap between the jobs that youth and less educated adult immigrants traditionally do, and youth labor supply appears more responsive to immigration-induced wage changes.

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    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/662073
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 55 - 89

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/662073

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Barnichon, Regis & Figura, Andrew, 2013. "Declining Labor Force Attachment and Downward Trends in Unemployment and Participation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-88, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Jennifer Hunt, 2012. "The Impact of Immigration on the Educational Attainment of Natives," NBER Working Papers 18047, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Regis Barnichon & Andrew Figura, 2013. "Declining Labor Force Attachment and Downward Trends in Unemployment and Participation," Working Papers 728, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Joan Llull, 2012. "Immigration, Wages, and Education: a Labor Market Equilibrium Structural Model," 2012 Meeting Papers 366, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Umkehrer, Matthias, 2013. "Youth Employment Instability, True State Dependence and Adult Wage Inequality," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80014, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Wozniak, Abigail & Murray, Thomas J., 2012. "Timing is everything: Short-run population impacts of immigration in US cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 60-78.
    7. Cadena, Brian C., 2014. "Recent immigrants as labor market arbitrageurs: Evidence from the minimum wage," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 1-12.

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