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Education, Self-Selection, and Intergenerational Transmission of Abilities

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  • Adalbert Mayer

Abstract

This article shows that the relationships between earnings and college education across generations can be explained by the intergenerational transmission of two distinct abilities and subsequent self‐selection of educational attainment. It is not necessary to invoke credit constraints. The model offers a way to reconcile the predictions of economic theory with empirical results that stress the importance of ability transmission across generations and question the importance of credit constraints for determining college attendance.

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File URL: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/resolve?id=doi:10.1086/587143
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Human Capital.

Volume (Year): 2 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 106-128

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:v:2:i:1:y:2008:p:106-128

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JHC/

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Cited by:
  1. Vincenzo Caponi, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Abilities and Self Selection of Mexican Immigrants," Working Paper Series 20-07, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, revised Jul 2007.
  2. Regina Riphahn & Florian Schieferdecker, 2012. "The transition to tertiary education and parental background over time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 635-675, January.
  3. Toshihiko Mukoyama & Aysegul Sahin, 2005. "Costs of Business Cycles for Unskilled Workers," Working Papers 05002, Concordia University, Department of Economics.
  4. Toshihiko Mukoyama & Aysegül Sahin, 2005. "The cost of business cycles for unskilled workers," Staff Reports 214, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  5. Montserrat Vilalta-Bufi(Universitat de Barcelona) & Ausias Ribo (Universitat de Barcelona), 2012. "Educational expansion, intergenerational mobility and over-education," Working Papers in Economics 284, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.

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