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How Inferences about Missing Attributes Decrease the Tendency to Defer Choice and Increase Purchase Probability

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  • Kunter Gunasti
  • William T. Ross Jr.
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    Abstract

    Most purchases involve choices among options with incomplete attribute information. In such situations, consumers often have the option not to choose any of the alternatives to avoid uncertainty. Alternatively, consumers can make inferences about the missing attributes. These inferences may occur spontaneously, or they may be strategically prompted. In five studies, it is shown that both explicitly and implicitly prompting consumers to make inferences about the missing attributes reduces the tendency to select the no-choice option and increases the likelihood of making a purchase decision. In parallel, consumers who generate spontaneous inferences are also less likely to defer their choices. (c) 2008 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc..

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 5 (October)
    Pages: 823-837

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:v:35:y:2009:i:5:p:823-837

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

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    Cited by:
    1. Thomas Kramer & Caglar Irmak & Lauren Block & Veronika Ilyuk, 2012. "The effect of a no-pain, no-gain lay theory on product efficacy perceptions," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 517-529, September.
    2. Gensler, Sonja & Hinz, Oliver & Skiera, Bernd & Theysohn, Sven, 2012. "Willingness-to-pay estimation with choice-based conjoint analysis: Addressing extreme response behavior with individually adapted designs," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 219(2), pages 368-378.
    3. Corinne Lamour & Catherine De La Robertie & Gérard Cliquet, 2013. "Prescription d'achats complexes: Proposition de définitions et d'un modèle," Post-Print hal-00784362, HAL.

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